Recursos

Green Climate Fund finally adopts robust Indigenous Peoples Policy

Indigenous Peoples have been advocating for a robust policy to protect their rights at the Green Climate Fund (GCF). After a number of years, and some delays, the Board of the GCF has adopted a policy which should ensure the rights of indigenous peoples are recognised, respected and promoted in climate-related funding.

Submission on the Green Climate Fund Environmental and Social Management System (ESMS)

Joint submission of Tebtebba (Indigenous Peoples' International Centre for Policy Research and Education) and Forest Peoples Programme as a response to the Call for for Public Inputs on the Environmental and Social Management System of the Green Climate Fund.

The joint Civil Society Organizations submission on the ESMS contains a set of proposals for procedures aimed at identifying assessing and managing social and environmental risks, while defining roles and responsibilities of the various actors and guidelines for monitoring and reporting.

The Green Climate Fund and FPIC - A call for the adoption of an indigenous peoples' policy: The lessons from a wetland project in Peru

Under considerable expectations and pressure to deliver shortly before the beginning of the UNFCCC 21st Conference of the Parties to be held in Paris, the Board of the Green Climate Fund  (GCF) considered the first projects for funding at its meeting in Zambia in early November, 2015.  One project presented to the GCF by Peruvian Implementing Entity (IE) PROFONANPE contains a proposal for wetland management with the participation of indigenous peoples in the province of Loreto in the eastern Amazon region.

IPO Letter to GCF Board

Indigenous Peoples' organisations raise concerns regarding the use of the terms “country ownership” and “multi-stakeholder engagement" ahead of Green Climate Fund meetings in Zambia, 2015. The letter is significant as it is the first official and widely supported position on the GCF expressed by Indigenous Peoples.

Read the full letter here

FPP E-Newsletter December 2013 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

What are the prospects for securing the land rights of indigenous peoples, local communities, and women in the foreseeable future?

Significantly, the report of the United Nations Secretary-General’s High Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda, under Goal 1 to “End Poverty”, sets a target to “Increase by x% the share of women and men, communities, and businesses with secure rights to land, property, and other assets”.

FPP E-Newsletter October 2013 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

The principle that the enjoyment of human rights is both the means and the goal of development, highlights the importance of human rights monitoring as a means for empowering rights-holders to exercise their rights, whilst holding States and other actors accountable for their human rights obligations.   

Bulletin d'information FPP Octobre 2013 (PDF Version)

Chers amis, 

Le principe selon lequel la jouissance des droits humains constitue à la fois le moyen et l’objectif du développement souligne l’importance du suivi des droits humains comme un moyen de permettre aux détenteurs de droits d’exercer leurs droits, tout en rendant les États et les autres acteurs responsables de leurs obligations en matière de droits humains. 

What is REDD+? A guide for indigenous communities - New edition

The 3rd edition of 'What is REDD+? A guide for indigenous communities' is now available here. This book seeks to help indigenous communities and their organisations to provide their people with basic information on REDD+. It is intended as a guide in understanding climate change, REDD+ and how they relate to the recognition and exercise of the collective rights of indigenous peoples.

Indigenous Peoples and support organisations' comments and recommendations on the modalities for selection, activities and role of observers and active observers in the Board of the Green Climate Fund

In response to a specific request by the Green Climate Fund Secretariat, Indigenous Peoples and support organisations have submitted their comments and recommendations on the modalities for selection, activities and role of observers and active observers in the Board of the Green Climate Fund - See Letter. Specific operational details are provided in the response to the questionnaire (attached).

Tebtebba Press Release: Implement safeguards on REDD Plus, indigenous caucus demands

Indigenous peoples called on the immediate implementation of the safeguards on REDD Plus. In a press conference a day before the end of the Durban Climate Change Conference, indigenous peoples belonging to the International Indigenous Peoples’ Forum on Climate Change (IIPFCC) called on state-parties for human rights to be central in any agreement on climate change.

9th RRI Dialogue on Forests, Governance and Climate Change, London, February 2011

The 9th RRI Dialogue on Forests, Governance and Climate Change, co-organized with Forest Peoples Programme, Tebtebba and Forest Trends, took place in London, UK on 8 February 2011. The Dialogue drew together a number of key actors involved in REDD, including representatives from Indigenous Peoples organizations, governments of UK Mexico and Norway, the banking sector, NGOs and researchers.

The consensus emerging from the discussion was that REDD should not proceed before clear safeguards are put in place. Gregory Barker, British minister of State, Department for Energy and Climate Change outlined that before REDD projects take place, it is crucial to assess drivers of deforestation, secure clarity of land tenure and ensure equitable benefit-sharing for Indigenous Peoples. To that end, he assured that the UK government will apply safeguards in bilateral REDD agreements with Indigenous Peoples and local communities. Despite this commitment he avoided mentioning whether the UK would push for stronger safeguards in the readiness processes of the World Bank’s FCPF initiative.

Le 9ème Dialogue de l’Initiative pour les droits et ressources sur les forêts, la gouvernance et les changements climatiques

Le 9ème Dialogue de l’Initiative pour les droits et ressources sur les forêts, la gouvernance et les changements climatiques, co-organisé avec le Forest Peoples Programme, Tebtebba et Forest Trends, a eu lieu à Londres, au Royaume-Uni, le 8 février 2011. Le Dialogue a réuni plusieurs acteurs clé de la REDD, notamment des représentants des organisations des peuples autochtones, les gouvernements du Royaume-Uni, du Mexique et de la Norvège, le secteur bancaire, des ONG et des chercheurs.  

Le consensus ayant émergé des discussions était que la REDD ne devrait pas se poursuivre tant que des garanties claires n’auront pas été mises en place. Gregory Barker, Ministre adjoint du Ministère de l’énergie et du changement climatique du gouvernement britannique, a souligné qu’il était crucial, avant que les projets REDD ne soient réalisés, d’évaluer les moteurs de la déforestation, de garantir un régime foncier clair et d’assurer un partage équitable des avantages pour les peuples autochtones. Dans ce but, il a affirmé que le gouvernement britannique appliquera des garanties dans les accords bilatéraux REDD avec les peuples autochtones et les communautés locales. Malgré cet engagement, il n'a pas indiqué si le Royaume-Uni oeuvrerait en faveur de garanties plus strictes dans les processus de préparation de l’initiative FCPF de la Banque mondiale.