Recursos

Nepal: Identity and equality is all that indigenous women want

Source: MyRepublica

The contours of “New Nepal” we all dream of cannot be shaped without appropriately addressing the concerns being raised by the indigenous women, who comprise half the female population. Traditionally, these women enjoyed greater degree of freedom and socioeconomic status than those from the so-called high caste Hindu groups such as Bahun, Chhetri, and Thakuri, who were restricted by pervasive patriarchy and religious orthodoxy. Unlike these women of the Indo-Aryan origin, the indigenous women were adept in handicrafts and other enterprises and freely participated in socio-cultural events. They faced no restriction during menstruation and were even free to choose their life partner and to remarry if they became single. They were also less affected by the dowry system.

The experience of Asian indigenous peoples with the finance lending policies of international financial institutions: A select overview

Projects and programme interventions of multilateral development banks have a record of systematic and widespread human rights violations for indigenous peoples in Asia. In many countries, indigenous peoples have been subjected to widespread displacement and irreversible loss of traditional livelihoods. Behind these human rights violations is the denial of indigenous peoples’ rights to their lands, territories and resources and to their right to give their free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) to projects and programme interventions, including those in the name of sustainable development and human development. Among them, the large infrastructure (dams and highway construction) and environmental “conservation” projects have had the most detrimental adverse impacts on indigenous peoples. There are a good number of examples of such projects that have negatively impacted indigenous peoples’ communities in Asian countries, some of which follow below.

A experiência de povos indígenas da Ásia com as políticas de empréstimos financeiros das instituições financeiras internacionais: Uma síntese seleta

Para os povos indígenas da Ásia, os projetos e intervenções dos bancos multilaterais de desenvolvimento têm um histórico de violações sistemáticas e generalizadas dos direitos humanos. Em muitos países, os povos indígenas são sujeitos a deslocamentos generalizados e perdas irreversíveis dos seus modos de subsistência tradicionais. Por trás destas violações de direitos humanos está a negação dos direitos dos povos indígenas às suas terras, territórios e recursos, e ao seu direito ao consentimento prévio, livre e informado (FPIC na sigla em inglês) em projetos e intervenções, inclusive os que levam a bandeira de desenvolvimento humano e sustentável. Entre eles, os grandes projetos de “conservação” ambiental e de infraestrutura (represas e construção de rodovias) tiveram os piores impactos prejudiciais nos povos indígenas. Existe um bom número de exemplos de projetos que tiveram um impacto negativo nas comunidades indígenas nos países asiáticos, alguns dos quais encontram-se abaixo.