Recursos

Making Palm Oil Accountable?

Globally oil palm plantations continue to expand at a rapid rate. World leader, Indonesia, has raced past Malaysia to become the number one producer. Latest data from the Indonesian watchdog NGO, SawitWatch, suggests that oil palm plantations in Indonesia now cover 11 million hectares, up from 6 million hectares only five years ago. New plantings are spreading to the smaller islands of the archipelago and to the less developed areas of eastern Indonesia. Hopes that a Presidential promise of a 2 year moratorium on forest clearance would slow the crop’s expansion – part of a deal to reduce green house gas emissions - have also evaporated as the government has excepted areas where preliminary permits have already been handed out.

¿Cómo obligar al sector del aceite de palma a rendir cuentas?

Las plantaciones de palma de aceite continúan expandiéndose rápidamente por todo el mundo. El país que encabeza esta tendencia, Indonesia, ha dejado atrás a Malasia y se ha convertido en el mayor productor. Según los últimos datos que ha proporcionado la ONG indonesia SawitWatch que vigila a este sector, actualmente las plantaciones de palma de aceite de Indonesia cubren 11 millones de hectáreas, mientras que hace tan solo cinco años cubrían 6 millones. Las nuevas plantaciones se están dispersando por islas más pequeñas del archipiélago y por las zonas menos desarrolladas del este de Indonesia. Las esperanzas de que una promesa presidencial de una moratoria de 2 años sobre la tala de bosques frenaría la expansión de este cultivo (parte de un acuerdo para reducir las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero) también se han evaporado ya que el Gobierno ha excluido de la moratoria zonas donde ya se han entregado permisos preliminares.

Rendre l’huile de palme responsable ?

Les plantations de palmier à huile continuent de s’étendre au niveau mondial à une cadence rapide. Le leader mondial du secteur, l’Indonésie, a devancé la Malaisie pour devenir le premier producteur au monde. Les données les plus récentes d’une ONG indonésienne qui surveille les développements, SawitWatch,  indiquent que les plantations de palmier à huile en Indonésie recouvrent désormais 11 millions d’hectares, alors qu’elles recouvraient 6 millions d’hectares il y a seulement cinq ans. De nouvelles plantations se propagent aux îles plus petites de l'archipel, et aux zones moins avancées de l'Indonésie orientale. Les espoirs liés à une promesse du Président d’instaurer un moratoire de deux ans sur la déforestation pour freiner l’expansion de cette culture (dans le cadre d’un accord pour réduire les émissions de gaz à effet de serre) se sont également évanouis, puisque le gouvernement a exclu les zones pour lesquelles des permis préliminaires ont déjà été accordés.

New FPP Publications:

FPP has published two new publications; 'Oil Palm Expansion in South East Asia: Trends and implications for local communities and indigenous peoples' and 'Divers paths to justice: Legal pluralism and the rights of indigenous peoples in Southeast Asia'.

Nuevas publicaciones del FPP:

FPP ha publicado dos nuevas publicaciones: 'Oil Palm Expansion in South East Asia - Trends and implications for local communities and indigenous peoples (Expansión de la palma de aceite en el sudeste de Asia - Tendencias e implicaciones para las comunidades locales y los pueblos indígenas)' y 'Divers paths to justice: Legal pluralism and the rights of indigenous peoples in Southeast Asia (Diversas vías de acceso a la justicia): pluralismo jurídico y los derechos de los pueblos indígenas en el sudeste de Asia)'.

Nouvelles publications du FPP :

FPP a publié deux nouvelles publications: 'Oil Palm Expansion in South East Asia: Trends and implications for local communities and indigenous peoples (L’expansion du palmier à huile en Asie du Sud-Est : tendances et conséquences pour les communautés locales et les peuples autochtones)' et 'Divers paths to justice: Legal pluralism and the rights of indigenous peoples in Southeast Asia (Les différentes voies menant à la justice : pluralisme juridique et droits des peuples autochtones en Asie du Sud-Est)'.

Updated Press Release: Bali Declaration acclaimed at Agribusiness and Human Rights in Southeast Asia Workshop

The international meeting of South East Asian Regional Human Rights Commissions on ‘Human Rights and Business: Plural Legal Approaches to Conflict Resolution, Institutional Strengthening and Legal Reform’ hosted by the Indonesian National Human Rights Commission (KOMNASHAM), in conjunction with Sawit Watch and Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) was held in Bali, Indonesia, from 28th November to 1st December 2011.

Press Release: Agribusiness and Human Rights in Southeast Asia Workshop brings together Human Rights Commissioners, indigenous peoples’ representatives, academics and NGOs from across the world. November 2011

PRESS INFORMATION – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

A landmark workshop, “Human Rights and Business: Plural Legal Approaches to Conflict Resolution, Institutional Strengthening and Legal Reform”, is taking place at the Santika Hotel, Kuta, Bali, from today until 1 December 2011, convened by the Indonesian National Commission on Human Rights (Komnas HAM) and supporting NGOs SawitWatch and Forest Peoples Programme. The event will be attended by over 60 participants, from the National Human Rights Commissions of the Southeast Asian region, the ASEAN Intergovernmental Human Rights Commission, notable academics, representatives of indigenous peoples, as well as members of supportive national and international NGOs.

Nur Kholis, Deputy Chairperson of the Indonesian National Human Rights Commission (Komnas HAM), said,

“We are taking this initiative in collaboration with the other human rights commissioners of South East Asia as a way of ensuring a more balanced approach to development based on respect for peoples’ rights, with an emphasis on the need to secure livelihoods and the right to food.”

Press Release: Palm Oil Need Not Harm Environment or Local Communities, says New Study. 21 November 2011

Click here to Download the PDF Version of this Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

The exponential growth in the palm oil sector, which accounts for a third of the total global trade of 130 million tons of vegetable oil annually, is strongly challenged by indigenous peoples and civil society organisations.  Indiscriminate land clearing and acquisition for oil palm plantations is resulting in rapid habitat loss, species extinctions and alarming greenhouse gas emissions. It has also led to the dispossession of both indigenous peoples and the rural poor who depend traditionally on forest habitats for their survival.

Press Release: New Report Exposes Human Rights Abuses in Wilmar Group Plantation in Jambi, Indonesia. Embargoed for 00:00 GMT, November 21 2011

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EMBARGOED for 8 am Malaysia 21 November 2011

A new report released today exposes how local Indonesian police (BRIMOB) in Jambi, working with plantation staff, systematically evicted people from three settlements, firing guns to scare them off and then using heavy machinery to destroy their dwellings and bulldoze concrete floors into the nearby creeks. The operations were carried out over a week in mid-August this year and have already sparked an international controversy. Andiko, Executive Director of the Indonesian community rights NGO, HuMa said: 

“Forced evictions at gun point and the destruction of the homes of men, women and children without warning or a court order constitute serious abuses of human rights and are contrary to police norms. The company must now make reparations but individual perpetrators should also be investigated and punished in accordance with the law.”

Oil Palm Expansion in South East Asia: Trends and implications for local communities and indigenous peoples

This insightful study by Forest Peoples Programme, SawitWatch, Samdhana Institute and the Center for People and Forests (RECOFTC) documents in detail, and for the first time, the way oil palm plantations are now expanding in very different ways across South East Asia as a whole. The study complements better known experiences in Malaysia, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea with new case studies of the processes of oil palm expansion in Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam and the Philippines. 

Ekspansi Kelapa Sawit di Asia Tenggara: Kecenderungan dan implikasi bagi masyarakat lokal dan masyarakat adat

Studi yang penuh wawasan oleh Forest Peoples Programme, SawitWatch, the Samdhana Institute dan the Centre for People and Forests ini mendokumentasikan rincian dan untuk pertama kalinya bagaimana perkebunan kelapa sawit berekspansi di seluruh Asia Tenggara. Studi ini melengkapi pengalaman-pengalaman terbaik yang diketahui di Malaysia, Indonesia dan Papua Nugini dengan studi kasus-studi kasus baru tentang proses ekspansi perkebunan kelapa sawit di Thailand, Kamboja, Vietnam dan Filipina.