Recursos

Loss of land is not the only challenge faced by Uganda’s Batwa women

In Uganda, many Batwa are homeless and isolated from their forests. For the women of the community, the situation is particularly challenging; rather than being able to gather foods from the forest, they must walk from one place to another in search of shelter, food and poorly paid work. Violence and discrimination are rife.

New paper by Marcus Colchester: Legal obstacles to territorial rights recognition, sustainable production and conservation on forest peoples’ lands

FPP's founder and Senior Policy Advisor, Marcus Colchester, has published a paper on "Legal obstacles to territorial rights recognition, sustainable commodity production and forest conservation on forest peoples’ lands in Southeast Asia with a focus on Indonesia and Malaysia." The paper is published by Liverpool University Press.

Cameroon's Baka people and the art of listening for honey bees

As a small child, Daniel Dindo learned how to travel deep into the rainforest of Cameroon and climb trees to collect honey without harming the bees or damaging their hive. Now, the land where he continues to practice this traditional harvest has been declared a protected area, and Daniel wonders what this will mean for the future of his village and his indigenous Baka culture.

La plateforme nationale camerounaise pour les peuples autochtones des forêts se réunit pour sa deuxième Assemblée Générale

Les 23 et 24 juillet, sous le couvert de la forêt communautaire Nomedjo à Lomié, la plateforme Gbabandi s'est réunie pour sa deuxième Assemblée Générale. Gbabandi comprend actuellement huit organisations autochtones, et plus de 100 Baka et Bagyeli ont participés à cette réunion de deux jours, venant de différentes régions forestières du Cameroun.

Peruvian authorities to remove protection for over 100,000ha of forest and indigenous lands

Regional authorities in Ucayali, Peru are to issue an order which will remove protections for over 100,000 hectares of Amazon rainforest, opening it up to settlers and allowing for the invasion of indigenous lands. The affected forests have previously been declared as “Permanent Production Forests” (BPP), meaning they enjoy a high degree of legal protection from deforestation.