Recursos

Serious setbacks in IFC’s handling of complaints about its support for Wilmar CAO admission of validity of NGO complaint regarding Wilmar ignored by IFC

UpdateFPP and 18 other NGOs, including local organisations in Indonesia, have been involved in a long-running process to get redress for the IFC’s persistent violations of its social and environmental policies in the palm oil sector in Indonesia. For over five years IFC has been providing financial support to the company Wilmar Trading / Wilmar International, one of the world’s largest palm oil dealers, directly and through various subsidiaries. In August 2007, FPP with other concerned NGOs and local organisations in Indonesia filed a complaint with the IFC Compliance Advisory Ombudsman (CAO) about this financing, alleging serious social and environmental problems in Wilmar’s operations, as well as violations of IFC’s own standards and procedures in making these credits and loans.

International Human Rights Day 2008: a sad day for indigenous peoples

Victoria Tauli-CorpuzExecutive Director, TEBTEBBA (Indigenous Peoples' International Centre for Policy Research and Education)Chair, UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous IssuesPoznan, Poland, 10 December 2008It is with great sadness that today, the 60th Anniversary of the adoption of the UN Declaration on Human Rights, some States have denied indigenous peoples of their rights at the 14th Conference of Parties of the UNFCCC.

Statement by indigenous peoples, local communities and NGOs at the UN Climate Change Conference, COP 14. Poznan, 9 December 2008

Indigenous peoples, local communities and NGOs challenge the removal of their rights from UNFCCC decision on REDD

We, the undersigned representatives of indigenous peoples, local communities and non-governmental organizations monitoring the progress of negotiations in Poznan are outraged that the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand opposed the inclusion of recognition of the rights of indigenous peoples and local communities in

Press Release - Appeal to HSBC to become more accountable in palm oil sector

A new report by the Forest Peoples Programme launched today demands greater accountability from HSBC, the biggest bank funding the palm oil sector in South East Asia. The fast-expanding palm oil sector is known to be a major driver of deforestation and the take-over of indigenous peoples' lands without their consent. Conflicts between indigenous peoples and palm oil companies are widespread in Malaysia and Indonesia.

HSBC and the palm oil sector in South East Asia: towards accountability

The fast-expanding palm oil sector is known to be a major driver of deforestation and of the take-over of indigenous peoples' lands without their consent. This report calls on HSBC to put pressure on the 17 major palm oil corporate groups that are among its clients in order to end violations of forest peoples' rights.

Free, Prior and Informed Consent and the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil - A guide for companies

A synthesis of training materials devised for communities and companies, and also local government, about how successful procedures can be carried out in line with the principle of FPIC - free, prior and informed consent - to enable indigenous peoples, local communities and other stakeholders to express their views in negotiations and for these views and wishes to be included in the RSPO's decision-making processes.