Recursos

Palm Oil controversies go global

In April, the European Parliament by a substantial cross-party majority adopted a report highlighting the human rights violations, labour abuses, land grabbing and environmental destruction associated with the production of palm oil. 

Las controversias del aceite de palma se globalizan

En abril el Parlamento Europeo aprobó, por una considerable mayoría de todos los partidos, un informe que pone de relieve las violaciones de los derechos humanos, los abusos laborales, el acaparamiento de tierras y la destrucción del medio ambiente asociados con la producción de aceite de palma.

Yangon Conference on Human Rights and Agribusiness in Southeast Asia: Proceedings

On 4 – 6 November, National Human Rights Commissions and civil society organisations of Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, Lao PDR and Myanmar, congregated in Yangon for the Fourth Regional Conference on Human Rights and Agribusiness in Southeast Asia. This year it was hosted by the Myanmar National Human Rights Commission, co-organised by Forest Peoples Programme and RECOFTC – The Centre for People and Forests, and supported by the Rights and Resources Initiative, Ford Foundation, the Climate and Land Use Alliance, and the UK Department for International Development.

Securing Forests, Securing rights: Report of the International Workshop on Deforestation and the Rights of Forest Peoples

The global forest crisis is worsening and infringements of the rights of indigenous peoples and forest-dependent communities are rising, according to a detailed assessment of nine country cases. Climate change mitigation and conservation policies must place community land rights and human rights centre-stage if they are to achieve the goal of sustainably reducing deforestation says the report.

Conflict or Consent? The oil palm sector at a crossroads

Click here to read related PRESS RELEASE.

Read this report in English or in Bahasa Indonesia

Growing global demand for palm oil is fuelling the large-scale expansion of oil palm plantations across Southeast Asia and Africa. Concerns about the environmental and social impacts of the conversion of vast tracts of land to monocrop plantations led in 2004 to the establishment of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), which encourages oil palm expansion in ways that do not destroy high conservation values or cause social conflict. Numerous international agencies have also called for reforms of national frameworks to secure communities’ rights and to develop sound land governance.

Conflict or Consent? The oil palm sector at a crossroads

Lea este informe en inglés o bahasa indonesia.

La creciente demanda mundial de aceite de palma está avivando la expansión a gran escala de plantaciones de palma de aceite por todo el sudeste de Asia y por África. La preocupación por las consecuencias ambientales y sociales de la conversión de vastas extensiones de tierra en plantaciones de monocultivo condujo al establecimiento en 2004 de la Mesa Redonda sobre el Aceite de Palma Sostenible (RSPO por sus siglas en inglés), la cual fomenta la expansión de la palma de aceite de maneras que no destruyan altos valores de conservación ni causen conflictos sociales. Numerosas agencias internacionales también han pedido reformas de los marcos nacionales para asegurar los derechos de las comunidades y establecer una gobernanza de la tierra buena y responsable.

Press Release - Sustainable Palm Oil: Marketing Ploy or True Commitment? New Research Questions Effectiveness of RSPO Standards

MEDAN, INDONESIA (7 November, 2013)—Members of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) are violating the rights of indigenous peoples and local communities in the forests and peatlands of tropical nations worldwide, according to a new research publication released today. The study details the performance of 16 oil palm operations, many run by RSPO members, reporting on their failure to uphold human rights and environmental standards required.

Agribusiness large-scale land acquisitions and human rights in Southeast Asia - Updates from Indonesia, Thailand, Philippines Malaysia, Cambodia, Timor-Leste and Burma

This series of studies provides updated information about large-scale land acquisitions in the region, with the aim of identifying trends, common threats, divergences and possible solutions. As well as summarising trends in investment, trade, crop development and land tenure arrangements, the studies focus on the land tenure and human rights challenges.

Agribusiness large-scale land acquisitions and human rights in Southeast Asia - Updates from Indonesia, Thailand, Philippines, Malaysia, Cambodia, Timor-Leste and Burma

Esta serie de estudios proporciona información actualizada sobre adquisiciones de tierra a gran escala en la región del sudeste asiático, con el fin de identificar tendencias, amenazas comunes, divergencias y posibles soluciones. Además de resumir las tendencias de la inversión, el comercio, el desarrollo de cultivos y los regímenes de tenencia de la tierra, los estudios se centran en los retos que plantean la tenencia de la tierra y los derechos humanos.

The experience of Asian indigenous peoples with the finance lending policies of international financial institutions: A select overview

Projects and programme interventions of multilateral development banks have a record of systematic and widespread human rights violations for indigenous peoples in Asia. In many countries, indigenous peoples have been subjected to widespread displacement and irreversible loss of traditional livelihoods. Behind these human rights violations is the denial of indigenous peoples’ rights to their lands, territories and resources and to their right to give their free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) to projects and programme interventions, including those in the name of sustainable development and human development. Among them, the large infrastructure (dams and highway construction) and environmental “conservation” projects have had the most detrimental adverse impacts on indigenous peoples. There are a good number of examples of such projects that have negatively impacted indigenous peoples’ communities in Asian countries, some of which follow below.

Resumen selecto de la experiencia de los pueblos indígenas asiáticos con las políticas de financiación de préstamos de las instituciones financieras internacionales

Los proyectos y las intervenciones programáticas de bancos multilaterales de desarrollo tienen un historial de violaciones sistemáticas y generalizadas de los derechos humanos de los pueblos indígenas en Asia. En muchos países, los pueblos indígenas han sido sometidos a desplazamientos generalizados y a la pérdida irreversible de sus medios de vida tradicionales. Detrás de estas violaciones de los derechos humanos está la negación de los derechos de los pueblos indígenas a sus tierras, territorios y recursos, y de su derecho a dar su consentimiento libre, previo e informado (CLPI) para proyectos e intervenciones programáticas, incluidas las que se hacen en aras del desarrollo sostenible y humano. Entre ellos, los grandes proyectos de infraestructura (construcción de presas y autopistas) y los proyectos de «conservación» medioambiental han tenido los impactos adversos más perjudiciales sobre los pueblos indígenas. Hay un gran número de ejemplos de proyectos de este tipo que han afectado negativamente a comunidades de pueblos indígenas de países asiáticos. 

FPP E-Newsletter Special Edition on Safeguards, April 2013 (PDF Version)

As multiple international agencies adopt and update their social and environmental policies, this special edition Forest Peoples Programme E-Newsletter reviews experiences of communities and civil society with the safeguard policies of various international financial institutions. 

E-Boletín FPP Edición Especial sobre las Salvaguardias, abril 2013 (PDF Version)

Mientras diversas entidades internacionales adoptan y actualizan sus políticas sociales y ambientales, este número especial del boletín electrónico de noticias del Forest Peoples Programme examina experiencias de comunidades y de la sociedad civil en relación con las políticas de salvaguardia de varias instituciones financieras internacionales. 

Video: Rethinking Foreign Direct Investments in Agriculture in South East Asia

This video, produced by the UNDP-UNEP Poverty-Environment Initiative (PEI), includes interviews with individuals from various NGOs, including FPP and Sawit Watch, during the Public Forum on Inclusive, Sustainable Foreign Direct Investments in Agriculture in South East Asia which took place in Bangkok in March 2013.

Updated Press Release: Bali Declaration acclaimed at Agribusiness and Human Rights in Southeast Asia Workshop

The international meeting of South East Asian Regional Human Rights Commissions on ‘Human Rights and Business: Plural Legal Approaches to Conflict Resolution, Institutional Strengthening and Legal Reform’ hosted by the Indonesian National Human Rights Commission (KOMNASHAM), in conjunction with Sawit Watch and Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) was held in Bali, Indonesia, from 28th November to 1st December 2011.