Recursos

The experience of Asian indigenous peoples with the finance lending policies of international financial institutions: A select overview

Projects and programme interventions of multilateral development banks have a record of systematic and widespread human rights violations for indigenous peoples in Asia. In many countries, indigenous peoples have been subjected to widespread displacement and irreversible loss of traditional livelihoods. Behind these human rights violations is the denial of indigenous peoples’ rights to their lands, territories and resources and to their right to give their free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) to projects and programme interventions, including those in the name of sustainable development and human development. Among them, the large infrastructure (dams and highway construction) and environmental “conservation” projects have had the most detrimental adverse impacts on indigenous peoples. There are a good number of examples of such projects that have negatively impacted indigenous peoples’ communities in Asian countries, some of which follow below.

Resumen selecto de la experiencia de los pueblos indígenas asiáticos con las políticas de financiación de préstamos de las instituciones financieras internacionales

Los proyectos y las intervenciones programáticas de bancos multilaterales de desarrollo tienen un historial de violaciones sistemáticas y generalizadas de los derechos humanos de los pueblos indígenas en Asia. En muchos países, los pueblos indígenas han sido sometidos a desplazamientos generalizados y a la pérdida irreversible de sus medios de vida tradicionales. Detrás de estas violaciones de los derechos humanos está la negación de los derechos de los pueblos indígenas a sus tierras, territorios y recursos, y de su derecho a dar su consentimiento libre, previo e informado (CLPI) para proyectos e intervenciones programáticas, incluidas las que se hacen en aras del desarrollo sostenible y humano. Entre ellos, los grandes proyectos de infraestructura (construcción de presas y autopistas) y los proyectos de «conservación» medioambiental han tenido los impactos adversos más perjudiciales sobre los pueblos indígenas. Hay un gran número de ejemplos de proyectos de este tipo que han afectado negativamente a comunidades de pueblos indígenas de países asiáticos. 

FPP E-Newsletter Special Edition on Safeguards, April 2013 (PDF Version)

As multiple international agencies adopt and update their social and environmental policies, this special edition Forest Peoples Programme E-Newsletter reviews experiences of communities and civil society with the safeguard policies of various international financial institutions. 

E-Boletín FPP Edición Especial sobre las Salvaguardias, abril 2013 (PDF Version)

Mientras diversas entidades internacionales adoptan y actualizan sus políticas sociales y ambientales, este número especial del boletín electrónico de noticias del Forest Peoples Programme examina experiencias de comunidades y de la sociedad civil en relación con las políticas de salvaguardia de varias instituciones financieras internacionales. 

Updated Press Release: Bali Declaration acclaimed at Agribusiness and Human Rights in Southeast Asia Workshop

The international meeting of South East Asian Regional Human Rights Commissions on ‘Human Rights and Business: Plural Legal Approaches to Conflict Resolution, Institutional Strengthening and Legal Reform’ hosted by the Indonesian National Human Rights Commission (KOMNASHAM), in conjunction with Sawit Watch and Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) was held in Bali, Indonesia, from 28th November to 1st December 2011.

Press Release: Agribusiness and Human Rights in Southeast Asia Workshop brings together Human Rights Commissioners, indigenous peoples’ representatives, academics and NGOs from across the world. November 2011

PRESS INFORMATION – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

A landmark workshop, “Human Rights and Business: Plural Legal Approaches to Conflict Resolution, Institutional Strengthening and Legal Reform”, is taking place at the Santika Hotel, Kuta, Bali, from today until 1 December 2011, convened by the Indonesian National Commission on Human Rights (Komnas HAM) and supporting NGOs SawitWatch and Forest Peoples Programme. The event will be attended by over 60 participants, from the National Human Rights Commissions of the Southeast Asian region, the ASEAN Intergovernmental Human Rights Commission, notable academics, representatives of indigenous peoples, as well as members of supportive national and international NGOs.

Nur Kholis, Deputy Chairperson of the Indonesian National Human Rights Commission (Komnas HAM), said,

“We are taking this initiative in collaboration with the other human rights commissioners of South East Asia as a way of ensuring a more balanced approach to development based on respect for peoples’ rights, with an emphasis on the need to secure livelihoods and the right to food.”