Recursos

Synthesis Paper - 10(c) Case Studies

Synthesis Paper - Customary sustainable use of biodiversity by indigenous peoples and local communities: Examples, challenges, community initiatives and recommendations relating to CBD Article 10(c)

A Synthesis Paper based on Case Studies from Bangladesh, Cameroon, Guyana, Suriname, Venezuela, Suriname and Thailand.

Indigenous peoples raise concerns over failure to meet protected area participation and benefit-sharing targets at Convention of Biological Diversity's SBSTTA-14 and in response to Global Biodiversity Outlook 3

Most of the world's biodiversity targets have not been met. This is the key message of the third edition of the Global Biodiversity Outlook (GBO-3), presented at the Convention of Biological Diversity (CBD)'s 14th meeting of the Subsidiary Body on Scientific, Technical and Technological Advice (SBSTTA-14). The report does, however, choose to highlight the expansion of protected areas as a positive accomplishment. For indigenous peoples this is a cause for concern - not a success - as the establishment and expansion of protected areas still largely takes place without their participation and consent. This concern was underlined in the conclusions of the in-depth review of the implementation of the CBD's Programme of Work on Protected Areas (PoWPA).

Baka and Bagyeli leaders highlight forest issues to media and wider public

Three indigenous leaders, Margrite Akom, Jeanne Noah and Mathilde Zang, from a remote forest near the UNESCO World Heritage Dja Reserve, Cameroon, were key figures in the development and construction of a Rainforest Garden at Chelsea Flower Show, London, from 25 to 29 May 2010. This garden highlighted their communities' traditions and concerns to the international media and wider public. At the event, the leaders spoke with the Queen, press and public, eloquently explaining the pressures they face including the discrimination and violation of their rights, the impact of industrial expansion and deforestation, and the loss of access to forest biodiversity upon which communities rely. Maps, developed by the Baka illustrating their traditional use of the forest for subsistence, were also incorporated into the garden. Margrite, Jeanne and Mathilde work with the African Indigenous Women's Organisation (AIWO) in Yaounde, Cameroon and were assisted by Aisha Aishatou from AIWO.

Press Release - Baka and Bagyeli forest communities at the Green & Black's Rainforest Garden, Chelsea Flower Show, London

"We are excited about this garden at the Chelsea Flower Show. It provides a wonderful opportunity to raise awareness among the wider public about the many challenges facing African forest peoples. These include discrimination and violation of their rights, the impact of industrial expansion and deforestation, and the loss of access to forest biodiversity upon which communities rely."