Ressources

The Green Climate Fund and FPIC - A call for the adoption of an indigenous peoples' policy: The lessons from a wetland project in Peru

Under considerable expectations and pressure to deliver shortly before the beginning of the UNFCCC 21st Conference of the Parties to be held in Paris, the Board of the Green Climate Fund  (GCF) considered the first projects for funding at its meeting in Zambia in early November, 2015.  One project presented to the GCF by Peruvian Implementing Entity (IE) PROFONANPE contains a proposal for wetland management with the participation of indigenous peoples in the province of Loreto in the eastern Amazon region.

Asserting community land rights using RSPO complaint procedures in Indonesia and Liberia

The complaints procedure of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) is one of the options available to communities threatened by the negative impacts of the palm oil industry. Drawing on direct experiences of supporting communities to use the RSPO complaints mechanism in Indonesia and Liberia, this review summarises how communities can get the most out of this procedure. Realistic outcomes include a temporary freeze on plantation development by palm oil companies while longer term solutions are negotiated.

Afirmando los derechos a la tierra de la comunidad utilizando los procedimientos de quejas y reclamos de la RSPO en Indonesia y Liberia

El procedimiento de quejas y reclamos de la Mesa Redonda sobre el Aceite de Palma Sostenible (RSPO) es una de las opciones disponibles para las comunidades amenazadas por los impactos negativos de la industria del aceite de palma. Con base en las experiencias directas de apoyo a las comunidades para utilizar el mecanismo de quejas y reclamos de la RSPO en Indonesia y Liberia, este documento resume la forma en la cual las comunidades pueden sacar un mayor provecho de este procedimiento.

New Analysis Reveals that Indigenous Lands Hold More than 20% of World’s Tropical Forest Carbon

New analysis of forests in indigenous territories shows recognizing, protecting rights of traditional peoples can make major contribution to slowing climate change and would support nat'l commitments to reduce climate impacts

An analysis released at the UN climate conference (known as COP 21) maps and quantifies, for the first time, the carbon stored in indigenous territories across the world’s largest expanses of remaining tropical forest.

Report calls on aluminium industry to respect indigenous peoples’ rights

Geneva, Switzerland, 16 November 2015 – While global demand for the world’s most popular metal – aluminium – continues to rise, it is critical that the aluminium industry address its environmental and social impacts, particularly in indigenous peoples’ territories, according to new report published today by Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP), Forest Peoples Programme (FFP) and International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Mining, the Aluminium Industry and Indigenous Peoples: Enhancing Corporate Respect for Indigenous Peoples’ Rights

The report, Mining, the Aluminium Industry and Indigenous Peoples: Enhancing Corporate Respect for Indigenous Peoples’ Rights, provides a global overview of the challenges facing indigenous peoples, and presents five case studies from Australia, Cambodia, Guinea, India and Suriname.  The case studies reveal that indigenous communities are affected by primary production activities, such as mining and associated infrastructure (Australia, India, Guine

Indigenous peoples in Paraguay recommend action on land rights and national legal reforms to uphold community rights, slow deforestation and protect the climate

Two new reports launched today by the Paraguayan Federation of Indigenous Peoples (FAPI) call for greater recognition of land rights and legislative reforms to secure community collective rights to land, tackle deforestation, curb land use emissions and harmonise national laws with international obligations to uphold human rights.

Los pueblos indígenas en Paraguay recomiendan que se adopten medidas sobre los derechos a la tierra y las reformas jurídicas nacionales para defender los derechos de la comunidad, frenar la deforestación y proteger el clima

Asunción, noviembre 12, 2015: dos nuevos informes lanzados hoy por la Federación por la Autodeterminación de los Pueblos Indígenas (FAPI) exigen un mayor reconocimiento de los derechos a la tierra y reformas jurídicas para garantizar los derechos colectivos de las comunidades a la tierra, hacer frente a la deforestación, reducir las emisiones provenientes del uso del suelo y armonizar las leyes nacionales con las obligaciones internacionales para defender los derechos humanos [disponible únicamente en español].

Los informes pueden ser descargados aquí:

Baram Dam Declaration

Participants at the World Indigenous Summit on Environment and Rivers, WISER Baram 2015, hosted by the grassroots network SAVE Rivers collectively produced a declaration that acknowledges the widespread suffering and destruction caused by dams, and stresses the importance of obtaining Free, Prior, and Informed Consent from communities impacted by dam building.

Oil palm land grabs and deforestation in Philippines condemned by human rights groups

A regional network of Asian human rights commissions and supportive NGOs has issued a strong statement supporting calls for a moratorium on palm oil expansion in the Philippines southern island of Palawan. The call came at the conclusion of a week of fact-finding trips and discussions of the 5th South East Asian Regional Conference on Human Rights and Agribusiness which was hosted by the Commission on Human Rights of the Philippines, the Coalition on Land Grabbing of the Philippines supported by the Forest Peoples Programme.

AIPP calls for greater respect for indigenous rights in the safeguards of Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank

Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) Public Statement, 23 October 2015 – Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact has called for greater respect for the rights of indigenous peoples inits comments [link to the letter] on the draft Environmental and Social Framework of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB). The comments endorsed by 119 organizations from 27 countries include recommendations for stronger safeguard for indigenous peoples.

Where They Stand

Where They Stand details how Wapichan people in South America use modern technologies in the struggle to secure their land rights

The Wapichan people of Guyana are using modern technology and community research to seek legal recognition of their ancestral land in the face of aggressive land-grabbing, destructive logging, and poisonous mining by illegal miners and foreign companies, finds new report by internationally acclaimed science writer Fred Pearce.

The Indigenous Wampis people of the Upper Amazon in Peru set to establish their own autonomous self governing body

The Indigenous Wampis people of the Upper Amazon in Peru are on the verge of establishing their own autonomous self governing  body to control and oversee their integralterritory. The Wampis communities reject large dam, road and hydrocarbon projects in their territory, (Statements and resolutions available in Spanish only).

Click here to view the statements

Statement A

La nación indígena Wampis del Alto Amazonas en Perú formará su propio organismo autónomo de autogobierno

La nación indígena Wampis del Alto Amazonas en Perú formará su propio organismo autónomo de autogobierno para controlar y vigilar su territoriointegral. Las comunidades Wampis rechazan las grandes represas, las carreteras, la minería ilegal y los proyectos de extracción de hidrocarburosen su territorio. Septiembre de 2015 (resoluciones y declaraciones disponibles únicamente en español).

Hacer clic aquí para ver las declaraciones:

Acta A

Nepali Communities Seek Justice for Violations in World Bank Project

Kathmandu, Nepal, July 14, 2015 – Last week an independent investigation revealed serious abuses in a World Bank-funded transmission line project in central Nepal. The Khimti-Dhalkebar transmission line runs through indigenous and rural communities, who have been raising concerns about the project for over five years. Though the findings validate community concerns, the World Bank has not committed to correcting the damage caused by its failures in this project.