Ressources

New publication from IWGIA - Cameroon: What Future for the Baka? Indigenous Peoples' Rights and Livelihood Opportunities in south-east Cameroon

IWGIA, Plan Finland and Plan Cameroon have published a report about the indigenous Baka living in Cameroon entitled What Future for the Baka? Indigenous Peoples' Rights and Livelihood Opportunities in south-east Cameroon. The report looks at the human rights situation of the indigenous hunter / gatherers of south-east Cameroon and their livelihood opportunities.

Central Africa: Great Lakes Region and Cameroon Article produced for The Indigenous World 2005, IWGIA's Yearbook, published May 2005

To obtain a copy of The Indigenous World 2005 from IWGIA, click here

At the International Conference on Peace, Security, Democracy and Development in the Great Lakes region in November 2004, 11 heads of state signed an agreement to end conflicts in the Great Lakes region, although the strategy to implement the declaration have yet to be agreed in inter-ministerial meetings during 2005.Despite this, conflicts continued to rage throughout the region, particularly in eastern DRC. There were signs of improving regional relations when the Congolese authorities signed separate joint verification mechanisms to improve border security with Rwanda and Uganda, while in August DRC, Rwanda and Uganda agreed to disarm groups operating within their territories within the year. Nevertheless, hostilities resumed in November when Rwanda’s President Kagame announced they would invade DRC again to disarm and repatriate Hutu militants because the Congolese authorities were not acting quickly enough to do so.

Indigenous Peoples' Rights, State Sovereignty and the Convention on Biological Diversity

It is often stated that attention to and respect for indigenous peoples’ rights in connection with the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) is barred by the principle of state sovereignty. This assertion is incorrect in light of contemporary international law. State sovereignty does not and cannot preclude attention to and respect for indigenous peoples’ internationally guaranteed rights.

Indigenous peoples and biodiversity conservation in Latin America: From principles to practice

Book available on request from FPP office: info@forestpeoples.org

Conservation agencies now recognise indigenous peoples' rights to ownership and control of their lands and resources, but how has this new partnership turned out in practice? Fifteen original case studies from Latin America provide practical lessons in how the interests of indigenous peoples and conservation objectives can be reconciled.