Ressources

Tanzania Indigenous Peoples Civil Societies voice serious concerns over proposed World Bank Environmental and Social Framework

Tanzania indigenous organisations have written to the World Bank to express their concern at the overall weakening of the policy requirements for indigenous peoples in the draft of the proposed World Bank Environmental and Social Safeguards (ESS). Concerns include implications for the denial of the existence and rights of indigenous peoples under international human rights law, lack of meaningful and effective participation, forced eviction and lack of access to information.

Indonesia promises to address forest destruction

Indonesia’s new president sets himself a major challenge to clean-up bribery and corruption in the forestry industry.

By Patrick Anderson

In late November, after a month in his new job, Indonesia’s president Joko Widido (Jokowi), travelled to Riau Province, Sumatra, to see for himself the forest destruction that causes smoke and haze to blanket Sumatra, Malaysia and Singapore.

Securing Forests, Securing rights: Report of the International Workshop on Deforestation and the Rights of Forest Peoples

The global forest crisis is worsening and infringements of the rights of indigenous peoples and forest-dependent communities are rising, according to a detailed assessment of nine country cases. Climate change mitigation and conservation policies must place community land rights and human rights centre-stage if they are to achieve the goal of sustainably reducing deforestation says the report.

Deforestation Drivers and Human Rights in Malaysia

Deforestation and forest degradation in Malaysia is a complex phenomenon with varying causes. So far, however, the focus has been largely on direct causes like industrial logging, large-scale commercial oil palm plantations and agribusiness, road construction and large dams. Far less attention has been paid to the indirect or underlying causes and agents, inter-linking and working to enrich the very few while creating hardships for many people as a result of degraded or diminished resources.

Assault on the Commons: Deforestation and the Denial of Rights in Indonesia

Indonesia is losing its forests faster than ever. Government efforts to halt the hand out of industrial permits for logging and plantations are failing. Despite its promises to cut back on greenhouse gas emissions, the country is experiencing a run-away process of forest clearance for oil palm estates and pulpwood plantations.

DRC: Conservation authorities will reconsider communities’ role in conservation in controversial new rainforest reserve

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo: WWF and the DRC government’s protected areas authority have agreed to reconsider the status of a controversial protected area after meeting yesterday with representatives of local communities who were threatened with loss of their lands and access to natural resources on which they depend for their livelihoods and survival.

Green City Resolution 2014: Legal and Good Governance Considerations

These resolutions were drafted during a seminar organized by the UK-based NGO Forest Peoples Programme and involving community members from Nguti, Ebanga, Sikam, Babensi II, Fabe, Massaka Bima, Mobenge, Ikoti-Ngolo, Ndiba-Ngolo, Oron-Isangele, Meangwe II Ngolo, Bweme-Ngolo, Lipenja II-Batanga, Toko and Baro, along with community support organisations, including the Centre for Environment and Development, Struggle to Economise Future Environment, Nature Cameroon and Greenpeace, who came to learn about their rights under national and international law with regard to developments on their customary lands.

Indonesia needs political reform, not just legal prosecution, to eradicate corruption in palm oil plantations

The article looks at the links between oil palm business and public officials. It comes to the conclusion that the prosecution of corrupt officials is failing to stop corruption by elected officials, and that reform of electoral funding laws is needed so that politicians and political parties do not have to reply on bribes or oligarchs to fund their election campaigns.

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The Batwa Petition Before Uganda's Constitutional Court

Author: United Organisation for Batwa Development in Uganda (UOBDU)

On 8th February 2013, the Batwa of Uganda submitted a petition to the Constitutional Court of Uganda seeking recognition of their status as indigenous peoples under international law and redress for the historic marginalisation and continuous human rights violations they have experienced as a result of being dispossessed of their ancestral forest lands by the government.

Before their eviction, the Batwa had lived in the forest since immemorial times. The measures taken to remove the Batwa, to create ‘environmentally protected’ areas, and to limit access and use of Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Mgahinga Gorilla National Park and Echuya Central Forest Reserve, resulted in the violation of the Batwa’s property rights over their ancestral lands. While colonial protection of the forest started in the 1920s, most Batwa continued to live in the forest and to use its resources until the 1990s; when they were evicted, without consultation, adequate compensation or offer of alternative land.