Ressources

UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination adopts NGO submissions on human rights in Papua

Following the submission of inputs on the human rights situation in Indonesia and Papua by indigenous peoples' organisations for the UN Universal Periodic Review in September 2016, the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) has considered, under its early warning and urgent action procedure, allegations of excessive use of force, arrests, killings and torture of persons belonging to the Papuan indigenous people in West Papua, Indonesia

Indigenous peoples’ organisations submit inputs on Indonesia for the UN Universal Periodic Review

The national indigenous peoples’ alliance in Indonesia, the Aliansi Masyarakat Adat Nusantara (AMAN) and the Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) have submitted a critical update to the UN Human Council’s Universal Periodic Review as the HRC prepares to review the human rights situation in Indonesia. Important threats to the security of indigenous peoples in the country are highlighted, as are recent legal changes in the country.

Papua New Guinea indigenous chiefs from Collingwood Bay reject Malaysian oil palm plantation and complain to RSPO

The traditional chiefs of Collingwood Bay in Papua New Guinea's Northern Province have filed a complaint with the RSPO accusing the Malaysian Company, Kuala Lumpur Kepong, of acting contrary to the RSPO Code of Conduct, Certification Systems and Principles and Criteria. In their detailed submission to the RSPO, they note that they have actively opposed oil palm developments on their lands since 2010.

Updated Press Release: Bali Declaration acclaimed at Agribusiness and Human Rights in Southeast Asia Workshop

The international meeting of South East Asian Regional Human Rights Commissions on ‘Human Rights and Business: Plural Legal Approaches to Conflict Resolution, Institutional Strengthening and Legal Reform’ hosted by the Indonesian National Human Rights Commission (KOMNASHAM), in conjunction with Sawit Watch and Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) was held in Bali, Indonesia, from 28th November to 1st December 2011.

Press Release: Agribusiness and Human Rights in Southeast Asia Workshop brings together Human Rights Commissioners, indigenous peoples’ representatives, academics and NGOs from across the world. November 2011

PRESS INFORMATION – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

A landmark workshop, “Human Rights and Business: Plural Legal Approaches to Conflict Resolution, Institutional Strengthening and Legal Reform”, is taking place at the Santika Hotel, Kuta, Bali, from today until 1 December 2011, convened by the Indonesian National Commission on Human Rights (Komnas HAM) and supporting NGOs SawitWatch and Forest Peoples Programme. The event will be attended by over 60 participants, from the National Human Rights Commissions of the Southeast Asian region, the ASEAN Intergovernmental Human Rights Commission, notable academics, representatives of indigenous peoples, as well as members of supportive national and international NGOs.

Nur Kholis, Deputy Chairperson of the Indonesian National Human Rights Commission (Komnas HAM), said,

“We are taking this initiative in collaboration with the other human rights commissioners of South East Asia as a way of ensuring a more balanced approach to development based on respect for peoples’ rights, with an emphasis on the need to secure livelihoods and the right to food.”

Press Release: Palm Oil Need Not Harm Environment or Local Communities, says New Study. 21 November 2011

Click here to Download the PDF Version of this Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

The exponential growth in the palm oil sector, which accounts for a third of the total global trade of 130 million tons of vegetable oil annually, is strongly challenged by indigenous peoples and civil society organisations.  Indiscriminate land clearing and acquisition for oil palm plantations is resulting in rapid habitat loss, species extinctions and alarming greenhouse gas emissions. It has also led to the dispossession of both indigenous peoples and the rural poor who depend traditionally on forest habitats for their survival.

Oil Palm Expansion in South East Asia: Trends and implications for local communities and indigenous peoples

This insightful study by Forest Peoples Programme, SawitWatch, Samdhana Institute and the Center for People and Forests (RECOFTC) documents in detail, and for the first time, the way oil palm plantations are now expanding in very different ways across South East Asia as a whole. The study complements better known experiences in Malaysia, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea with new case studies of the processes of oil palm expansion in Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam and the Philippines. 

Ekspansi Kelapa Sawit di Asia Tenggara: Kecenderungan dan implikasi bagi masyarakat lokal dan masyarakat adat

Studi yang penuh wawasan oleh Forest Peoples Programme, SawitWatch, the Samdhana Institute dan the Centre for People and Forests ini mendokumentasikan rincian dan untuk pertama kalinya bagaimana perkebunan kelapa sawit berekspansi di seluruh Asia Tenggara. Studi ini melengkapi pengalaman-pengalaman terbaik yang diketahui di Malaysia, Indonesia dan Papua Nugini dengan studi kasus-studi kasus baru tentang proses ekspansi perkebunan kelapa sawit di Thailand, Kamboja, Vietnam dan Filipina.

UN human rights bodies take note of massive land speculation in Papua New Guinea

Lands held and managed under custom in Papua New Guinea (PNG) are regularly quoted as covering the vast majority of the country’s land mass, 97% is the usually accepted figure. The remaining 3% of lands, no longer governed by tradition and custom, are referred to as ‘alienated lands’ and come under the management of the Department of Lands and Physical Planning.  However these remarkable figures of land tenure security hide a grimmer truth. Over the past 13 months alone almost 10% of the land mass of Papua New Guinea has been issued out as concessions under an arrangement known as ‘Special Agricultural and Business Leases’ (SABL). Under these lease agreements, the government leases customary lands from traditional owners and re-leases the same lands, often to a third party, with customary rights to the lands suspended for the term of the lease.  

Los órganos de la ONU dedicados a los derechos humanos toman nota de la enorme especulación con la tierra en Papúa Nueva Guinea

En repetidas ocasiones se ha afirmado que las tierras bajo sistemas consuetudinarios de tenencia y gestión de la tierra en Papúa Nueva Guinea (PNG) cubren la mayor parte de la superficie del país, siendo la cifra normalmente aceptada un 97%. El 3% restante, que ya no depende de la tradición ni la costumbre, corresponde a «tierras enajenadas» y es gestionado por el Ministerio de Tierras y Planificación Física.  Sin embargo estas sorprendentes cifras de la seguridad de la tenencia de la tierra ocultan una verdad más cruda.

Les organes des droits humains des Nations Unies prennent note de la spéculation foncière en masse en Papouasie-Nouvelle-Guinée

Des données indiquent de façon récurrente que les terres détenues et gérées selon la coutume en Papouasie-Nouvelle-Guinée (PNG) couvrent la vaste majorité de la masse terrestre du pays, 97% étant le chiffre d’ordinaire accepté. Les 3% de terres restantes qui ne sont plus régies par la tradition et la coutume sont généralement dénommées « terres aliénées » et sont soumises à la gestion du Département des terres et de l’aménagement du territoire. Toutefois, derrière ces chiffres remarquables en termes de sécurité foncière se cache une réalité plus sombre.