Ressources

Indigenous peoples’ organisations submit inputs on Indonesia for the UN Universal Periodic Review

The national indigenous peoples’ alliance in Indonesia, the Aliansi Masyarakat Adat Nusantara (AMAN) and the Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) have submitted a critical update to the UN Human Council’s Universal Periodic Review as the HRC prepares to review the human rights situation in Indonesia. Important threats to the security of indigenous peoples in the country are highlighted, as are recent legal changes in the country.

Mining, the Aluminium Industry and Indigenous Peoples: Enhancing Corporate Respect for Indigenous Peoples’ Rights

The report, Mining, the Aluminium Industry and Indigenous Peoples: Enhancing Corporate Respect for Indigenous Peoples’ Rights, provides a global overview of the challenges facing indigenous peoples, and presents five case studies from Australia, Cambodia, Guinea, India and Suriname.  The case studies reveal that indigenous communities are affected by primary production activities, such as mining and associated infrastructure (Australia, India, Guine

Toolkit on the Inter-American human rights system for indigenous women

In order for the Inter-American human rights system to adequately recognise, protect and fulfil the human rights of indigenous women, it is necessary for indigenous women to engage with the system, to make their voices heard and to tell their stories with all their complexities. This toolkit, which contains a series of information notes explaining different aspects of the Inter-American system, is designed to help indigenous women and their advocates to use the system effectively.

Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) Submission on Safeguards Information System (SIS)

Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) position on the Safeguards Information System (SIS).

The submission was made to the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA) under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) on 24 Sept. 2014. The submission includes the list of 37 endorsements from indigenous peoples organisations and civil society organisations.

Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) New Publication: HerStory of Empowerment, Leadership and Justice

‘The indigenous women’s voices and “her stories”, as an integral part of the women’s movement and indigenous peoples’ movement, remain faint. This reflects the overall conditions of indigenous women as relatively more marginalized, discriminated against and dis-empowered at all levels. It also illustrates the urgent need to strengthen indigenous women’s organizations and institutions, as well as their leadership and effective participation, in all matters that concern them as women and as indigenous peoples.’ Joan Carling, Secretary General, AIPP.

Mining the Womb of the Earth: Struggles of Indigenous Women against destructive mining

This publication, published by AIPP, is a collection of stories of struggle of some indigenous women in Asia who directly face the negative impacts of mining. This publication is part of the Indigenous Peoples Human Rights Defenders Network (IPHRD Net) efforts to inform actors and stakeholders of the efforts of indigenous women and their communities to address violations of their rights, particularly their collective rights as indigenous peoples. The IPHRD Net is supported by the European Instrument for Democracy and Human Rights (EIDHR).

FPP E-Newsletter December 2013 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

What are the prospects for securing the land rights of indigenous peoples, local communities, and women in the foreseeable future?

Significantly, the report of the United Nations Secretary-General’s High Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda, under Goal 1 to “End Poverty”, sets a target to “Increase by x% the share of women and men, communities, and businesses with secure rights to land, property, and other assets”.

New publication by AIPP - Learn and Exercise Your Rights: A simplified version of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP)

While indigenous peoples are five percent of the global population, they comprise fifteen percent of the poorest of the poor. Throughout centuries, indigenous peoples have been asserting and defending their lands, territories and resources as the source of their distinct identities, cultures and ways of life. They continue to voice and demand the recognition of their collective rights as a matter of attaining equality and dignity for all.

Submission to the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW): The Land Rights of Rural Women. 31 October 2013

A formal submission to the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) to contribute to the elaboration of a General Recommendation on Rural Women under the Convention. The submission highlights the specific circumstances of indigenous women and the need to focus on achieving coherence between CEDAW and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. 

We Have Rights: A Community Guide for Indigenous Peoples on the 2009 ADB Safeguard Policy Statement and Accountability Mechanism

The Asia Indigenous Peoples’ Pact (AIPP) is proud to offer this community guide as a response to the continuing need to produce resource materials useful for advocacy work and community actions. In addition, the materials can contribute in strengthening the capacity of member-organizations for local, national and regional engagements. The Guide also hopes to contribute in building a fully-informed network of indigenous communities and advocates that actively addresses the multi-faceted challenges confronting the world’s indigenous peoples, particularly in Asia where majority of indigenous communities are found.

FPP E-Newsletter July 2013 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

Mutual recognition, mutual respect and mutual benefit are among the desirable attributes of all human relationships. Indigenous peoples and other forest peoples also expect these qualities in their relationships with others – be they governments, private corporations, NGOs or other indigenous peoples’ organisations and communities. This issue of Forest Peoples Programme’s E-Newsletter reports on the state of various relationships between forest peoples and different institutions – as these are forged, tested or broken –in the course of assertions for upholding basic human rights, social justice and solidarity.

Bulletin d'information FPP Juillet 2013 (PDF Version)

Chers amis,

La reconnaissance mutuelle, le respect mutuel et les avantages réciproques figurent parmi les attributs souhaitables de toute relation humaine. Les peuples autochtones et les autres peuples des forêts s’attendent eux aussi à trouver ces qualités dans leurs relations avec des tiers, qu’il s’agisse de gouvernements, d’entreprises privées, d’ONG ou d’autres organisations et communautés de peuples autochtones. Cette édition du bulletin d’information du Forest Peoples Programme rend compte du statut de diverses relations entre les peuples des forêts et différentes institutions, au fur et à mesure de leur établissement, mise à l’épreuve ou rupture, suite à des revendications en faveur du respect des droits humains fondamentaux, de la justice sociale et de la solidarité.

Violence Against Indigenous Women And Girls: A Complex Phenomenon

This briefing note, published by the Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) and Forest Peoples Programme, is intended to develop discussion and thought about the complexity of the challenges of violence against indigenous women and girls. Work being done by indigenous women’s organisations in Asia and around the world has increasingly drawn attention to the need for specific analysis and understanding to be established of the nature and forms of such violence. This note also intends to shed light on the need to respect rights in totality, to simultaneously respect and protect the individual and collective rights of indigenous women.

Violence Against Indigenous Women And Girls: A Complex Phenomenon (La violence à l’égard des femmes et des filles autochtones : un phénomène complexe)

Cette note d’information, publiée par le Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) et le Forest Peoples Programme, a pour objectif de promouvoir le débat et la réflexion sur la complexité des défis liés à la violence à l’égard des femmes et des filles autochtones. Le travail des organisations de femmes autochtones d’Asie et du monde entier se concentre de plus en plus sur la nécessité d’effectuer une analyse spécifique pour mieux comprendre la nature et les formes de cette violence. Cette note entend par ailleurs mettre l’accent sur la nécessité de se conformer aux droits dans leur totalité, pour respecter et protéger en même temps les droits individuels et collectifs des femmes autochtones.