Forest Peoples Programme Supporting forest peoples’ rights

Self-determination

FPP works to realise forest peoples’ right to self-determination, a fundamental right of all peoples that underpins the work of the United Nations. That this right also applies to peoples within nation states is made explicitly clear in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) in Articles 3 and 4.

What does the right to self-determination mean?

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) in Articles 3 and 4 states:

Article 3
Indigenous peoples have the right to self-determination. By virtue of that right they freely determine their political status and freely pursue their economic, social and cultural development.

Article 4
Indigenous peoples, in exercising their right to self-determination, have the right to autonomy or self-government in matters relating to their internal and local affairs, as well as ways and means for financing their autonomous functions.

FPP’s work with forest peoples is guided by forest peoples themselves. The focus of this work is to:

  • get the rights and interests of forest peoples recognised in policies and programmes
  • support forest peoples to build their capacity to claim and exercise their human rights
  • counter top-down policies and projects that affect forest peoples
  • promote community-based, sustainable forest management
  • coordinate NGO actions on forests in line with forest peoples’ visions
  • link up indigenous and forest peoples’ movements at the regional and international level.

Relevant resources

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Wampis autonomous government declares a state of environmental emergency after oil spill

24 March, 2016

The Wampis autonomous government has issued a Supreme Order declaring the area affected the oil spill in the community of Mayuriaga to be in a state of environmental emergency.

According to Peru’s regulatory body of the environment OEFA, 1,000 barrels of oil spilled into the community land on 3 February 2016 when a 40-year-old pipeline owned by the state oil company Petroperú ruptured.

The spill affected 400m2 of land, and flowed into the Cashacaño river, which then flows into the river Morona.

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Livelihoods and forests at increased risk if land rights are ignored, says new report

2 March, 2016

Global Call to Action on Indigenous and Community Land Rights

Indigenous Peoples and local communities protect half the world's land, but formally own just 10 percent, according to a report released today by a global alliance of NGOs.

London, March 2nd 2016: The Global Call to Action on Indigenous and Community Land Rights, backed by more than 300 organizations all over the world, launches today with the publication of a new report.

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Recognizing and expanding the territories of original peoples in Colombia is critical for the peace process

2 March, 2016

Press Note for the Global call to action on Indigenous and Community Land Rights

In Colombia, over 30% of the national territory has been officially titled to Indigenous Peoples, with some 6 million hectares of collective lands recognized for Afro-Descendant Communities. Nonetheless, in practice these territories are not recognized in the State’s actions, with mining, oil and gas, logging and other concessions issued unilaterally without upholding Indigenous or Afro-Descendant Peoples’ right to free, prior and informed consent.

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Press release: Wampis denounce negligence of state oil company Petroperú after oil spill devastates their territory

2 March, 2016

Community demands immediate suspension of pipeline use

London, March 2nd 2016: On the 18th February 2016 the autonomous territorial government of the indigenous Wampis people (Wampis GTA) submitted a formal complaint to Peru’s regulatory body for the environment (OEFA) accusing the state oil company (Petroperú) of gross negligence for its failure to prevent and contain the oil spill in the Wampis community of Mayuriaga. As a preventative measure the Wampis GTA demand that the pumping of oil along a branch of the pipeline is suspended.

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Pushing for peace in Colombia: Indigenous and Afro-Descendant Peoples join forces to uphold their rights, address mining-related conflict

Forest Peoples Programme
Palenke Alto Cauca - Proceso de Comunidades Negras,
Resguardo Indígena Cañamomo Lomaprieta

2 March, 2016

 This executive summary/resumen ejecutivo synthesizes the outcomes of Year 1 (2014-2015) of a two year inter-ethnic project between the Embera Chamí People of the Resguardo Indígena Cañamomo Lomaprieta (Riosucio, Supía – Caldas) and Afro-Descendant Communities of the Palenke Alto Cauca – Proceso de Comunidades Negras (northern Cauca) aimed at organizational strengthening and territorial defense ar

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Liberia FPIC Training Materials: 'Communities in the Driving Seat'

Forest Peoples Programme
Sustainable Development Institute
Social Entrepreneurs for Sustainable Development

24 February, 2016

Communities in the Driving Seat: A manual on Free, Prior and Informed Consent

This suite of training materials has been developed for communities in Liberia to help increase awareness of the key principles surrounding free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) and to improve the implementation of these principles in practice.

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New Analysis Reveals that Indigenous Lands Hold More than 20% of World’s Tropical Forest Carbon

1 December, 2015

New analysis of forests in indigenous territories shows recognizing, protecting rights of traditional peoples can make major contribution to slowing climate change and would support nat'l commitments to reduce climate impacts

An analysis released at the UN climate conference (known as COP 21) maps and quantifies, for the first time, the carbon stored in indigenous territories across the world’s largest expanses of remaining tropical forest.

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Asserting community land rights using RSPO complaint procedures in Indonesia and Liberia

Tom Lomax/FPP
IIED

1 December, 2015

Asserting community land rights using RSPO complaint procedures in Indonesia and Liberia

The complaints procedure of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) is one of the options available to communities threatened by the negative impacts of the palm oil industry. Drawing on direct experiences of supporting communities to use the RSPO complaints mechanism in Indonesia and Liberia, this review summarises how communities can get the most out of this procedure. Realistic outcomes include a temporary freeze on plantation development by palm oil companies while longer term solutions are negotiated.

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A message to the world from the Wampis

30 November, 2015

My name is Andres Noningo Sesen, I live in Puerto Galilea, a community in Northern Peruvian amazon. We are Wampis, one of the first peoples. Our ancestral lands cover over 1.3 million hectares of forest in the river basins of the Kanus (river Santiago) and Kanken (river Morona). We Wampis are a forest people, traditionally we lived in small groups, dispersed in the forest, hunting, fishing and gathering. It’s only recently that we have settled in large communities.

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Press Release: The Wampis nation of the Peruvian Amazon declares the creation of the first autonomous indigenous government in Peru

30 November, 2015

**PRESS RELEASE: For immediate Release**

The Wampis nation of the Peruvian Amazon declares the creation of the first autonomous indigenous government in Peru to defend the totality of their ancestral territory covering 1.3 million hectares of tropical forest.

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