Forest Peoples Programme Supporting forest peoples’ rights

Responsible finance

The Responsible Finance Programme (RFP) aims to make public and private finance for development and the environment fully accountable to the public and affected communities. FPP advocates for rights-based approaches in development and emphasises that international finance agencies have a duty to ensure that the aid and investments that they support uphold the obligations of donor and recipient countries under international law.

Advocacy targets include the World Bank Group, the Inter-American Development Bank (IADB) and Asian Development Bank alongside bilateral aid agencies such as the UK Department for International Development (DFID). The programme also carries out advocacy on the private sector with the aim of promoting respect for human rights and greater corporate accountability.

FPP’s advocacy activities seek to ensure that international financial institutions (IFIs) and development agencies adopt and fully comply with social and environmental policies that are in line with international standards, including human rights norms. RFP tracks the different safeguard policies of IFIs and pushes for upward harmonisation in standards and the establishment of mechanisms and incentives to promote effective implementation of safeguards.

Major efforts are also made to monitor IFI loan and grant operations affecting forests and forest-dependent communities. Where requested by local partners, FPP may also assist community appeals and complaints to IFI accountability mechanisms in order to help them secure redress and expose problems in IFI due diligence.

Relevant resources

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Conflict or Consent? The oil palm sector at a crossroads

FPP, Sawit Watch and TUK Indonesia

7 November, 2013

Conflict or consent? The oil palm sector at a crossroads

Click here to read related PRESS RELEASE.

Read this report in English or in Bahasa Indonesia

Growing global demand for palm oil is fuelling the large-scale expansion of oil palm plantations across Southeast Asia and Africa. Concerns about the environmental and social impacts of the conversion of vast tracts of land to monocrop plantations led in 2004 to the establishment of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), which encourages oil palm expansion in ways that do not destroy high conservation values or cause social conflict. Numerous international agencies have also called for reforms of national frameworks to secure communities’ rights and to develop sound land governance.

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CSO letter on support for CAO

15 July, 2014

CSO letter to the President of the World Bank Group expressing support for the office of the Compliance Advisor Ombudsman (CAO).

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Indonesia needs political reform, not just legal prosecution, to eradicate corruption in palm oil plantations

10 July, 2014

Workers loading fresh fruit bunches

The article looks at the links between oil palm business and public officials. It comes to the conclusion that the prosecution of corrupt officials is failing to stop corruption by elected officials, and that reform of electoral funding laws is needed so that politicians and political parties do not have to reply on bribes or oligarchs to fund their election campaigns.

To read the full article please click here

 

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Press Release: Communities protest that UK's Equatorial Palm Oil are poised to seize land in Liberia

24 June, 2014

The UK-listed company, Equatorial Palm Oil (EPO), which is threatening to seize land owned by Liberians in defiance of commitments by Liberia’s President, will today receive a visit from affected communities. Members of the Jogbahn Clan, together with representatives from Liberian and international NGOs, will deliver a petition with over 90,000 signatures, reminding EPO that it does not have community consent to expand onto their lands, and that doing so could escalate violence. EPO’s past operations in Liberia have triggered allegations of conflict and human rights abuses.

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Indigenous Peoples' Rights and Climate Policies in Guyana: a special report

Amerindian peoples Association (APA)
Forest Peoples Programme (FPP)

11 June, 2014

Indigenous People’s Rights, Forests and Climate Policies in Guyana

 

More than four years after the signing of the Guyana-Norway MoU, this special report seeks to assess the quality of treatment of indigenous peoples’ rights in Guyana’s national policies on land, low carbon development and forests. The review draws on extensive community visits and policy analyses conducted by the Amerindian Peoples Association (APA) and the Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) between 2009 and 2013.

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Urgent letter from indigenous peoples’ organisations to the World Bank President: respect our rights in the new safeguard policies

5 June, 2014

A letter endorsed widely by indigenous peoples’ organisations and support organisations, including FPP, was sent to the President of the World Bank Group, Dr. Kim, to ask him to support the inclusion of a requirement for free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) in the new safeguard policies, and to ensure that the policies respected the rights of indigenous peoples, regardless of the governments under which they live.

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Urgent letter sent from FPP to the World Bank President

5 June, 2014

Urgent letter sent from FPP to the World Bank President, Dr Kim regarding concerns with the development of the new safeguard system to be proposed specifically the need to enshrine FPIC and to apply the policy in a strictly nondiscriminatory manner.

To read the letter please click here

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Analysis and understanding of risk: Recommendations to the New Approach to Country Engagement

29 May, 2014

Forest peoples Programme and Amnesty International

May 21, 2014

Recommendations for the revision of the New Approach to Country Engagement

We welcome the opportunity to provide detailed inputs into the ongoing revisions and discussions on the draft proposed new approach to country level engagement in the World Bank change strategy.

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Press release: Illegal conversion timber export threatens African countries' forests and agreements with EU

27 May, 2014

Illegal and corrupt behaviour by foreign-owned companies engaged in establishing large palm oil plantations not only threatens local communities and forested areas throughout west and central Africa, but will seriously undermine legislation being set up between African countries and the European Union to prevent just that says Greenpeace International.

In a new report published today, Greenpeace reveals how one company in Cameroon, has colluded with government officials to illegally obtain a permit to export timber that itself was illegally felled in order to establish a palm oil plantation in the South West region of the country.

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