Resources

'Conflict or Consent?' Chapter 11 The Mani people of Thailand on the agricultural frontier

This is the eleventh chapter of 'Conflict or Consent? The oil palm sector at a crossroads'.

This paper results from a short diagnostic survey, undertaken jointly by the Indigenous Peoples Foundation of Thailand and the Forest Peoples Programme in January 2013. The study aimed to ascertain the situation of the Mani people in relation to agricultural expansion, draw attention to their plight and consolidate links between them and the indigenous peoples of the north.

Conflict or Consent? The oil palm sector at a crossroads

Click here to read related PRESS RELEASE.

Read this report in English or in Bahasa Indonesia

Growing global demand for palm oil is fuelling the large-scale expansion of oil palm plantations across Southeast Asia and Africa. Concerns about the environmental and social impacts of the conversion of vast tracts of land to monocrop plantations led in 2004 to the establishment of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), which encourages oil palm expansion in ways that do not destroy high conservation values or cause social conflict. Numerous international agencies have also called for reforms of national frameworks to secure communities’ rights and to develop sound land governance.

Agribusiness large-scale land acquisitions and human rights in Southeast Asia - Updates from Indonesia, Thailand, Philippines Malaysia, Cambodia, Timor-Leste and Burma

This series of studies provides updated information about large-scale land acquisitions in the region, with the aim of identifying trends, common threats, divergences and possible solutions. As well as summarising trends in investment, trade, crop development and land tenure arrangements, the studies focus on the land tenure and human rights challenges.

FPP E-Newsletter February 2012 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

Balancing human beings’ need for decent livelihoods against the imperative of securing our environment is, arguably, the biggest challenge facing our planet. This struggle between ‘development’ and ‘conservation’ is being played out in global policy negotiations, with the decisions of so-called policy-makers being imposed on the ground. But not everything is or should be ‘top down’. Enduring solutions also spring from the grassroots, from the ‘bottom up’.

Oil Palm Expansion in South East Asia: Trends and implications for local communities and indigenous peoples

This insightful study by Forest Peoples Programme, SawitWatch, Samdhana Institute and the Center for People and Forests (RECOFTC) documents in detail, and for the first time, the way oil palm plantations are now expanding in very different ways across South East Asia as a whole. The study complements better known experiences in Malaysia, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea with new case studies of the processes of oil palm expansion in Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam and the Philippines. 

Synthesis Paper - 10(c) Case Studies

Synthesis Paper - Customary sustainable use of biodiversity by indigenous peoples and local communities: Examples, challenges, community initiatives and recommendations relating to CBD Article 10(c)

A Synthesis Paper based on Case Studies from Bangladesh, Cameroon, Guyana, Suriname, Venezuela, Suriname and Thailand.

FPP series on Forest Peoples and Protected Areas

This series of eight country studies and a synthesis report review the progress of the application of indigenous peoples' rights with regards to protected areas since 2003. By considering the views of governments, funding agencies, conservation organisations and indigenous peoples' organisations, these studies assesses the extend to which recommendations and resolutions from the Durban 2003 World Parks Congress, the 4th World Conservation Congress in Barcelona and the Convention on Biological Diversity have been followed up on and enacted.

Statement on the Treatment of Rohingya and Bangladeshi 'Boat People' in Asia

A joint statement from Amnesty International Australia and 93 other non-government organisations voices concern over reports that Rohingyas from Burma and migrants from Bangladesh have been forcibly expelled and abandoned in international waters by the Thai security forces since December 2008.

 

 

Indigenous knowledge, customary use of natural resources and sustainable biodiversity management: Case study of Hmong and Karen Communities in Thailand - 10(c) Case Study

This report is the outcome of a participatory research project carried out among four highland communities in Thailand. It provides a unique record of the knowledge, customs and traditions of the Hmong and Karen peoples in their management and sustainable use of natural resources and biodiversity.

Highland Mapping Development and Biodiversity Management Project, Inter-Mountain Peoples' Education and Culture in Thailand Association (IMPECT) with Forest Peoples Programme

The Pulp Invasion: the international pulp and paper industry in the Mekong Region

BOOK AVAILABLE ON REQUEST FROM FPP: info@forestpeoples.org

This report looks at the current state of the pulp and paper industry in Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam. It looks at the extent of plantations and their social and environmental impacts in the region, institutional support of industrial plantations, and local resistance to ecological damage and loss of livelihood. The book's aim is to support communities' rights to make their own decisions about the management of their rivers, farmlands and forests.