Resources

Thai Government reminded again of human rights obligations

The UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (UNCERD) has again reminded the Royal Thai Government of its human rights obligations towards the Karen people in Kaeng Krachan National Park, and more widely to support and promote the retention and celebration of Karen culture as per the Royal Thai Government resolu

Karen Indigenous People - Request for Consideration of the Situation

An Urgent Action / Early Warning submission has been submitted to UNCERD (UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination) from the Karen Network on Culture and Environment, the Indigenous Peoples Education and Environment Foundation, the Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact and Forest Peoples Programme, regarding the violation of the land righ

New video produced by IMPECT: Natural Resource Management

Thailand has a population of more than 2 million indigenous people. It is estimated that 1.2 million live in the highlands in the north of the country. During the last four decades, most of these areas have been declared by the Thai government as protected areas, meaning that local communities don't have the right to manage their natural resources and to farm in their own areas.

FPP E-Newsletter February 2012 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

Balancing human beings’ need for decent livelihoods against the imperative of securing our environment is, arguably, the biggest challenge facing our planet. This struggle between ‘development’ and ‘conservation’ is being played out in global policy negotiations, with the decisions of so-called policy-makers being imposed on the ground. But not everything is or should be ‘top down’. Enduring solutions also spring from the grassroots, from the ‘bottom up’.

Pilot Whakatane Assessment in Ob Luang National Park, Thailand, finds exemplary joint management by indigenous peoples, local communities, National Park authorities and NGOs

Since its inception at the IUCN Commission on Environmental, Economic and Social Policy (CEESP) ‘Sharing Power’ conference in Whakatane, New Zealand, in January 2011, the Whakatane Mechanism has been piloted in two places: at Mount Elgon in Western Kenya and most recently in the Ob Luang National Park in Northern Thailand.

Gender dimensions in indigenous peoples’ customary use of biodiversity

Recent work carried out by various indigenous peoples, such as community mapping and documenting traditional resource use, has resulted in interesting insights into the different gender dimensions in their customary use of biodiversity. In many indigenous communities, there are clear divisions in men’s and women’s roles and tasks relating to biodiversity use. This article shares some examples from case studies carried out by the Wapichan people from South-west Guyana and by the Karen and Hmong people from Northern Thailand. 

Synthesis Paper - 10(c) Case Studies

Synthesis Paper - Customary sustainable use of biodiversity by indigenous peoples and local communities: Examples, challenges, community initiatives and recommendations relating to CBD Article 10(c)

A Synthesis Paper based on Case Studies from Bangladesh, Cameroon, Guyana, Suriname, Venezuela, Suriname and Thailand.

Customary practices of indigenous peoples in spotlight at upcoming CBD meeting

The sustainable customary practices of indigenous peoples, the subject of Article 10(c) of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), will be one of the main topics at the upcoming meeting of the CBD Working Group on Article 8(j) and Related Provisions (WG-8(j) 6) in Montreal from 2-6 November 2009. A key question on the agenda asks how Parties to the Convention can improve implementation of this important article. The message of indigenous and local communities, submitted ahead of the meeting, is that secure rights to land and resources is a necessary condition to achieve effective implementation of Article 10(c).

FPP series on Forest Peoples and Protected Areas

This series of eight country studies and a synthesis report review the progress of the application of indigenous peoples' rights with regards to protected areas since 2003. By considering the views of governments, funding agencies, conservation organisations and indigenous peoples' organisations, these studies assesses the extend to which recommendations and resolutions from the Durban 2003 World Parks Congress, the 4th World Conservation Congress in Barcelona and the Convention on Biological Diversity have been followed up on and enacted.