Resources

A letter on the weaknesses of REDD in Peru

A letter from AIDESEP to the Participants Committee of the FCPF on the 20 March 2017 in which AIDESEP highlights the holes and weaknesses of the REDD strategy in Peru as indicated in the mid-term evaluation report of the project and the broken commitments of the government made with indigenous peoples to recognise and respect their t

Palm oil industry group orders company to halt Peru planting

Source: Reuters - Tue, 26 Apr 2016 00:58 GMT, Author: Reuters

LIMA, April 25 (Reuters) - A palm oil industry body on Monday ordered a member company with a 5,000 hectare (12,355 acre) concession in Peru to stop developing new plantations until it can prove it has not cleared any primary forest.

The dispute comes amid growing concerns from environmentalist and indigenous communities about the rapid expansion of oil palm plantations in the Peruvian Amazon in recent years.

Indigenous peoples' organisation FECONAU and indigenous community present first Peruvian complaint to RSPO regarding harmful oil palm development on their lands in the Amazon region

Yarinacocha, December 5th 2015: Today on the 5th of December 2015 we, the Federación de Comunidades Nativas del Ucayali – FECONAU (Federation of Native Communities of Ucayali) representing 35 communities of the Shipibo-Konibo indigenous people from the Ucayali region and Santa Clara de Uchunya, located in Requena, Ucayali region in Peru, presented our formal complaint to the RSPO mechanism against the company Plantaciones de Pucallpa SAC, member of the RSPO.

PRESS RELEASE: Peruvian indigenous leader in London to denounce illegal deforestation of 5000 hectares of Peru’s Amazon for palm oil

London, 2nd November 2015: Robert Guimaraes Vasquez, a leader of the Shipibo-Konibo indigenous people in Peru’s Amazon has travelled to a global forum in London on business, deforestation and human rights to highlight the destruction of his people’s traditional lands by an international agribusiness group and member of the RSPO (Round Table for Sustainable Palm oil), a global body that certifies that the production and trade of palm oil is sustainable and respects human rights.

Peru’s failure to address indigenous peoples’ land struggle and control illegal deforestation exposes empty pledges of its government to tackle deforestation

The failure to resolve the underlying land tenure problems of indigenous peoples is one of the main factors behind the increasing deforestation in Peru as reported in a national deforestation study produced by FPP and AIDESEP and launched at the UN Climate talks held in Peru in 2014.  Peru hands over the Presidency of the climate change talks to France in Paris this year and since 2010 has made ambitious pledges to resolve indigenous peoples’ landrights struggles as part of its commitments to protect forests and mitigate climate change in which it has pledged to reduce net deforestatio

Peru’s government fails to tackle violence and forest destruction in the Peruvian Amazon

In April 2014, in a tragic premonition of what was to come, the leaders of Saweto, an Ashaninka village in the Peruvian Amazon, requested urgent measures from the Peruvian government to ‘prevent any attempt on our lives’. The threat had come from loggers ‘in reprisal’ for the community’s longstanding efforts to document and denounce illegal logging in their territory.

Indigenous organisations petition Peruvian government to protect the rights of isolated peoples before the Inter American Commission on Human Rights

On 1 November 2013 indigenous and civil society organisations from Peru including FENAMAD, AIDESEP, Derecho Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (DAR), and the National Human Rights Coordinator presented evidence in a hearing before the Inter-American Commission.

The petitioners documented the failure of the Peruvian government to provide effective protection for isolated indigenous peoples in Peru.

Peru: Indigenous and human rights organisations demand that the State guarantee strict protection for indigenous peoples in isolation in the Kugapakori-Nahua-Nanti Reserve

In statements published in a Peruvian national newspaper and online, both AIDESEP (the national indigenous Amazonian organisation) and over 50 Peruvian and international civil society organisations, including Forest Peoples Programme, have reiterated their demand that the State establish strict measures for the protection of isolated peoples in Peru.

Peruvian indigenous organisations insist that the World Bank establishes mechanisms to ensure that the Forest Investment Programme (FIP) in Peru respects their rights

On the eve of the Peruvian government's final consultation with indigenous peoples on the draft investment plan of the FIP, indigenous organisations expressed their cautious welcome of the latest version of the plan, which includes key agreements on their customary land rights reached with indigenous peoples. Nevertheless, they expressed their grave concern that last minute adjustments were made to the plan without their agreement.

Peru commits to respecting indigenous peoples’ rights to land and resources in its forest and climate plan: but will it keep its promise?

On 2 August 2013 indigenous organisations and representatives of the Peruvian government reached an agreement to modify controversial aspects of the government’s draft Forest Investment Plan (“FIP Plan”), an initiative financed by the World Bank’s Forest Investment Programme (FIP), to address deforestation. The plan was due to be presented to the World Bank’s FIP sub-committee in October 2013 but a draft version was roundly denounced by indigenous organisations in July as it continued to ignore indigenous proposals and violated Peru’s legal obligations to respect indigenous peoples’ rights to land and resources and the World Bank’s own safeguard policies. 

Peruvian government u-turn paves way for illegal expansion of Camisea gas project

In an embarrassing u-turn the Peruvian Vice Ministry of Culture has withdrawn its formal observations on the proposed expansion of the Camisea gas project within a Reserve for isolated peoples which included the conclusions that the health, traditional economic activities and ways of life of the indigenous peoples in ‘initial contact’ and ‘voluntary isolation’ (‘isolated peoples’) in the region will be severely impacted and two of them, the Nanti and the Kirineri, could be made ‘extinct.’