Resources

Press release: UN Racial Discrimination Committee recommends Suriname's urgent action to recognize and respect the land and resource rights of indigenous peoples and Maroons

The forested interior of Suriname is home to Amazonian Indians and so-called Maroons, descendants of escaped African slaves who recreated societies in Suriname’s hinterland in the 17th and 18th centuries. These peoples have long complained that they suffer persistent and pervasive racial discrimination that is particularly evident in the government’s failure to recognize their rights to their ancestral lands, which have instead been parcelled out to loggers, miners and as protected areas. Last week, the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination agreed with them for a second time in a year.

Protecting and encouraging customary use of biological resources: The Upper Caura, Venezuela - 10(c) Case Study

Article 10(c) of the CBD requires States to protect and encourage customary use of biological resources. This study of and by the indigenous Ye'kwana and Sanema peoples of the Upper Caura, Venezuela, demonstrates that their traditional practices are clearly ‘compatible with conservation and sustainable use’. Encouragingly, the legal framework for State compliance already exists and merely needs to be put into practice.

Press release: United Nations Finds Serious Human Rights Violations of Indigenous and Tribal Communities in Suriname

The forested interior of Suriname is home to Amazonian Indians and so-called Maroons, descendants of escaped slaves who recreated societies in Suriname’s hinterland in the 17th and 18th centuries. These peoples have long complained that they suffer persistent and pervasive racial discrimination and are provided with substandard health care and schools. Their main concern is that the government of Suriname has failed to recognize their rights to their ancestral lands, instead parcelling out their forests, to loggers, miners and as protected areas. On 21 March 2003, the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination agreed with them.

Press release: Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) requests that Suriname suspend logging and mining concessions in Saramaka Maroon territory

On August 8, 2002, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) issued a request to the Government of Suriname asking that it “take appropriate measures to suspend all concessions, including permits and licenses for logging and mine exploration and other natural resource development activity on lands used and occupied by the 12 Saramaka clans

Mining and Amerindians in Guyana

Final report of the APA/NSI project on 'Exploring Indigenous Perspective on Consultation and Engagement within the Mining Sector in Latin America and the Caribbean'.

Click here to read the report.

Indigenous peoples and biodiversity conservation in Latin America: From principles to practice

Book available on request from FPP office: info@forestpeoples.org

Conservation agencies now recognise indigenous peoples' rights to ownership and control of their lands and resources, but how has this new partnership turned out in practice? Fifteen original case studies from Latin America provide practical lessons in how the interests of indigenous peoples and conservation objectives can be reconciled.