Resources

Press release: Wampis denounce negligence of state oil company Petroperú after oil spill devastates their territory

Community demands immediate suspension of pipeline use

London, March 2nd 2016: On the 18th February 2016 the autonomous territorial government of the indigenous Wampis people (Wampis GTA) submitted a formal complaint to Peru’s regulatory body for the environment (OEFA) accusing the state oil company (Petroperú) of gross negligence for its failure to prevent and contain the oil spill in the Wampis community of Mayuriaga. As a preventative measure the Wampis GTA demand that the pumping of oil along a branch of the pipeline is suspended.

Indigenous peoples in Suriname win important case in the Inter-American Court of Human Rights

On 28 January 2016, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights made public its judgment in the case of the Kaliña and Lokono Peoples v. Suriname. This case was first submitted to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights in January 2007 by the chiefs of the eight Kaliña and Lokono villages of the Lower Marowijne River and the Association of Indigenous Village Leaders in Suriname (VIDS).

Venezuela: armed assaults on Yabarana indigenous peoples by illegal miners

Alarming reports have emerged of illegal miners harassing the lives of Piaroa, Yabarana and Hiwi indigenous peoples in the Manapiare valley in the Venezuelan Amazon. The latest report details how illegal miners attacked and seriously wounded the Yabarana leader, Benjamin Perez, who leads the organisation, OIYAPAM, and then burned down his farm.

Climate project may end with rainforest destruction

The flagship of Norway's rainforest initiative in Guyana could be replaced by mining, logging and large-scale deforestation. The Amaila Falls hydro power plant may not be constructed due to the economic risk. However, the Guyanese government now wants to use the road leading to the site, which has already been built, to extract minerals and timber from the pristine rainforest.

The Green Climate Fund and FPIC - A call for the adoption of an indigenous peoples' policy: The lessons from a wetland project in Peru

Under considerable expectations and pressure to deliver shortly before the beginning of the UNFCCC 21st Conference of the Parties to be held in Paris, the Board of the Green Climate Fund  (GCF) considered the first projects for funding at its meeting in Zambia in early November, 2015.  One project presented to the GCF by Peruvian Implementing Entity (IE) PROFONANPE contains a proposal for wetland management with the participation of indigenous peoples in the province of Loreto in the eastern Amazon region.

The Situation of Indigenous Peoples in Paraguay: Their lands and the Laws that Would Protect Them

On 12 November 2015, Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) and its partner in Paraguay, the Federación por la Autodeterminación de los Pueblos Indígenas (FAPI) released a companion set of reports describing the current situation of indigenous people, their lands, resources, and territories in Paraguay, along with the national legal framework that is meant to respect, promote and protect their rights.  Many have argued that the last big “land grab” with respect to indigenous lands, resources and territories will not be from large infrastructure projects, but from conservation and resource protection initiatives.

Protecting the Amazon is the key to resolving the climate crisis

December 11 2015: It is 11.30 in the morning in Paris, the negotiation among the members of the Conference of the Parties (COP 21) is crucial to build consensus towards a new global climate agreement, an agreement that seeks to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and thus mitigate climate change.

Indigenous peoples' organisation FECONAU and indigenous community present first Peruvian complaint to RSPO regarding harmful oil palm development on their lands in the Amazon region

Yarinacocha, December 5th 2015: Today on the 5th of December 2015 we, the Federación de Comunidades Nativas del Ucayali – FECONAU (Federation of Native Communities of Ucayali) representing 35 communities of the Shipibo-Konibo indigenous people from the Ucayali region and Santa Clara de Uchunya, located in Requena, Ucayali region in Peru, presented our formal complaint to the RSPO mechanism against the company Plantaciones de Pucallpa SAC, member of the RSPO.

A message to the world from the Wampis

My name is Andres Noningo Sesen, I live in Puerto Galilea, a community in Northern Peruvian amazon. We are Wampis, one of the first peoples. Our ancestral lands cover over 1.3 million hectares of forest in the river basins of the Kanus (river Santiago) and Kanken (river Morona). We Wampis are a forest people, traditionally we lived in small groups, dispersed in the forest, hunting, fishing and gathering. It’s only recently that we have settled in large communities.

Indigenous peoples in Guyana call for strong protections for customary land rights and application of FPIC in timber trade agreement with the EU

In two newly released reports, indigenous leaders point out that the current concession allocations system in Guyana is unjust, severely flawed and facilitated by a national legal framework that does not fully respect their internationally protected rights to their customary lands and resources.

The foreign companies come and they have legal rights and we the people who have been living here all the time do not have legal rights.” [Resident, Kwebanna village]

Press Release: “We are going to kill you”: Indigenous activist’s life in danger after opposing destruction of Peruvian Amazon

London, 18 November 2015: Washington Bolivar, an indigenous activist in Peru has received another sinister death threat in the immediate wake of his efforts to challenge the destruction of Amazon rainforest for timber extraction and conversion to oil palm.

In the course of the last month, human rights defender, Mr Bolivar received the following handwritten and explicit notes in quick succession:

Indigenous peoples in Paraguay recommend action on land rights and national legal reforms to uphold community rights, slow deforestation and protect the climate

Two new reports launched today by the Paraguayan Federation of Indigenous Peoples (FAPI) call for greater recognition of land rights and legislative reforms to secure community collective rights to land, tackle deforestation, curb land use emissions and harmonise national laws with international obligations to uphold human rights.

PRESS RELEASE: Peruvian indigenous leader in London to denounce illegal deforestation of 5000 hectares of Peru’s Amazon for palm oil

London, 2nd November 2015: Robert Guimaraes Vasquez, a leader of the Shipibo-Konibo indigenous people in Peru’s Amazon has travelled to a global forum in London on business, deforestation and human rights to highlight the destruction of his people’s traditional lands by an international agribusiness group and member of the RSPO (Round Table for Sustainable Palm oil), a global body that certifies that the production and trade of palm oil is sustainable and respects human rights.

Peru’s failure to address indigenous peoples’ land struggle and control illegal deforestation exposes empty pledges of its government to tackle deforestation

The failure to resolve the underlying land tenure problems of indigenous peoples is one of the main factors behind the increasing deforestation in Peru as reported in a national deforestation study produced by FPP and AIDESEP and launched at the UN Climate talks held in Peru in 2014.  Peru hands over the Presidency of the climate change talks to France in Paris this year and since 2010 has made ambitious pledges to resolve indigenous peoples’ landrights struggles as part of its commitments to protect forests and mitigate climate change in which it has pledged to reduce net deforestatio

Where They Stand

Where They Stand details how Wapichan people in South America use modern technologies in the struggle to secure their land rights

The Wapichan people of Guyana are using modern technology and community research to seek legal recognition of their ancestral land in the face of aggressive land-grabbing, destructive logging, and poisonous mining by illegal miners and foreign companies, finds new report by internationally acclaimed science writer Fred Pearce.

‘State of emergency’ for Paraguay’s tribal peoples

Indigenous peoples in Paraguay are in a state of emergency according to the United Nations’ Special Rapporteur for indigenous peoples.

A new U.N. report [Spanish] found “persistent racism,” “discrimination” and a total failure by the Paraguayan state to uphold indigenous peoples’ land rights.