Resources

South East Asian Human Rights Commissions call for freeze on agribusiness concessions until indigenous and community rights secured

4 November, Kota Kinabalu: After a week of field investigations and searching discussions, the 6th Southeast Asian Conference on Human Rights and Agribusiness issued a resolution calling for moratoriums to halt the further hand out of concessions throughout the region. The meeting noted how land conflicts as a result of agribusiness expansion are proliferating and urged a pause in the hand out of licenses while community and indigenous peoples’ land rights are secured.

New video exposes reality of oil palm land grabs in Indonesia

Jail is the reward for Momonus and Jamaludin to defend their ancestral lands. For 12 years already these Semunying indigenous territories have been controlled by P.T. In Ledo Lestari. Their dense forest had been turned into a palm oil plantation landscape. Although they have been persecuted and abused in their ancestral land, their fight is not extinguished.

Wilmar fails to resolve conflicts with communities in West Kalimantan and West Sumatra

In December 2013, following pressure from its customers and investors, the palm oil giant Wilmar committed to delinking its entire supply chain, including joint ventures and third-party suppliers, from deforestation, peatland development, and human rights abuses.  The commitment, to be fully implemented by December 2015, was welcomed by groups who had tracked and criticised Wilmar for its environmental destruction and human rights abuses. Two years on however, despite its promises, Wilmar has failed to resolve many long standing conflicts between its operations and impacted communities. The following material looks at a couple of cases where Wilmar has failed to resolve its conflicts with communities.

Updates and Geotagged reports from Palawan

The Coalition Against Land Grabbing (CALG), Palawan, have released revised versions of three major reports produced mainly through the Ecosystem Alliance Fund.  One report focuses on the case of oil palm expansion in Sarong (Municipality of Bataraza), another deals with the conversion of primary upland forest for rubber plantations on the West Coast of Aborlan and the last one concerns organised squatting by migrants into the forest land of indigenous Tagbanua tribes.