Resources

Groundbreaking study carried out by indigenous peoples in Guyana highlights land tenure insecurity and urgent need for reform

The Amerindian Peoples Association (APA) is pleased to present a new comprehensive study on the lack of tenure security faced by indigenous communities in Guyana’s Northwest District. ‘Our Land, Our Life: A participatory assessment of the land tenure situation of indigenous peoples in Guyana’ was published in collaboration with UK non-governmental organisation Forest Peoples Programme (FPP).

Local Biodiversity Outlooks

A publication bringing together the perspectives and experiences of indigenous peoples and local communities (IPLCs) on the implementation of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity has been officially launched at the thirteenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD COP13) in Cancun, Mexico.

New report on the International Workshop on Indigenous Women’s Rights, Land and Resources.

As the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-based Violence come to a close today, FPP reflects on the actions needed now to concretely and effectively address the role and position of women fighting for the collective rights of their peoples. In this context we are pleased to present a follow-up new report on the International Workshop on Indigenous Women’s Rights, Land and Resources.

Sengwer Women’s Experiences of Evictions

Since the 1960s, the Sengwer peoples of western Kenya have been experiencing forced evictions from their home in the name of conservation. Since 2014, these evictions have intensified.

Indigenous peoples’ organisations submit inputs on Indonesia for the UN Universal Periodic Review

The national indigenous peoples’ alliance in Indonesia, the Aliansi Masyarakat Adat Nusantara (AMAN) and the Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) have submitted a critical update to the UN Human Council’s Universal Periodic Review as the HRC prepares to review the human rights situation in Indonesia. Important threats to the security of indigenous peoples in the country are highlighted, as are recent legal changes in the country.

Pinpointing problems – seeking solutions: A rapid assessment of the underlying causes of forest conflicts in Guyana

Based on the experiences of Amerindian communities in Guyana, this briefing presents some of the main causes of forest conflicts in the country as well as recommendations for how to address these. In particular, the document presents the following points: • Lack of full recognition of indigenous peoples’ land rights in line with international law, absence of effective FPIC procedures and limited transparency in forest governance are key underlying causes of forest-related conflicts in Guyana; 

Behind the Veil: Transparency, Access to Information and Community Rights in Cameroon's Forestry Sector

In 2010, Cameroon and the European Union signed a Voluntary Partnership Agreement on forest law enforcement, governance and trade in timber and derived products. One apparently positive element highlighted by the European Union and civil society organisations has been the inclusion of a 'transparency annex' in the document, which aimed to "make information available for public scrutiny to improve transparency and accountability".

Annual Report 2015

Forest peoples and indigenous organisations in Asia, Africa, and South and Central America have made considerable progress over the last year in their work to secure their rights. Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) has continued to support forest peoples’ efforts to gain ownership of their lands, aiming to ensure that their voices are heard across the complex political and social global landscape as they assert their human rights. 

Securing Forest Peoples’ Rights and Tackling Deforestation in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Deforestation and forest degradation have increased in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), despite the government’s commitment to safeguard its forests.

Illegal logging, unsustainable mining, commercial agriculture, and urban demand for fuelwood represent only some of the major long-term threats to the forests. By contrast, the traditional livelihood strategies of indigenous and local communities show a capacity to coexist with forests sustainably.

Status and Trends in Traditional Occupations

FPP has produced a new report presenting the outcomes of preliminary research on the practice of traditional occupations in indigenous and local communities. While the rapid assessment only provides sample insights (from 17 experts in 13 countries), it brings together unique and diverse stories, experiences and views on these occupations from a ground-level perspective.

Indonesian Human Rights Commission’s National Inquiry on Indigenous Peoples’ Rights in Forests finds rights unprotected and recommends recognition

INDONESIA: KomNasHAM, the Indonesian Human Rights Commission, just issued an English summary of its recent National Inquiry on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples on the Territories in the Forest Zone. Based on legal review, extensive testimony heard through seven hearings in all parts of the country and in depth investigation of 47 cases, the Inquiry found that despite Constitutional guarantees of the rights of the country’s indigenous peoples, these rights are systematically denied.

Comments on Overarching Human Rights Provisions in the World Bank’s Environmental and Social Framework

The Coalition for Human Rights in Development submitted recommendations this week urging the World Bank to amend its proposed Environmental and Social Framework to meaningfully address human rights. The submission addresses arguments that have been put forward against embracing human rights and provides concrete recommendations for strengthening the draft framework.Read more here.