Resources

Behind the Veil: Transparency, Access to Information and Community Rights in Cameroon's Forestry Sector

In 2010, Cameroon and the European Union signed a Voluntary Partnership Agreement on forest law enforcement, governance and trade in timber and derived products. One apparently positive element highlighted by the European Union and civil society organisations has been the inclusion of a 'transparency annex' in the document, which aimed to "make information available for public scrutiny to improve transparency and accountability".

Annual Report 2015

Forest peoples and indigenous organisations in Asia, Africa, and South and Central America have made considerable progress over the last year in their work to secure their rights. Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) has continued to support forest peoples’ efforts to gain ownership of their lands, aiming to ensure that their voices are heard across the complex political and social global landscape as they assert their human rights. 

Securing Forest Peoples’ Rights and Tackling Deforestation in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Deforestation and forest degradation have increased in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), despite the government’s commitment to safeguard its forests.

Illegal logging, unsustainable mining, commercial agriculture, and urban demand for fuelwood represent only some of the major long-term threats to the forests. By contrast, the traditional livelihood strategies of indigenous and local communities show a capacity to coexist with forests sustainably.

Status and Trends in Traditional Occupations

FPP has produced a new report presenting the outcomes of preliminary research on the practice of traditional occupations in indigenous and local communities. While the rapid assessment only provides sample insights (from 17 experts in 13 countries), it brings together unique and diverse stories, experiences and views on these occupations from a ground-level perspective.

Indonesian Human Rights Commission’s National Inquiry on Indigenous Peoples’ Rights in Forests finds rights unprotected and recommends recognition

INDONESIA: KomNasHAM, the Indonesian Human Rights Commission, just issued an English summary of its recent National Inquiry on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples on the Territories in the Forest Zone. Based on legal review, extensive testimony heard through seven hearings in all parts of the country and in depth investigation of 47 cases, the Inquiry found that despite Constitutional guarantees of the rights of the country’s indigenous peoples, these rights are systematically denied.

Comments on Overarching Human Rights Provisions in the World Bank’s Environmental and Social Framework

The Coalition for Human Rights in Development submitted recommendations this week urging the World Bank to amend its proposed Environmental and Social Framework to meaningfully address human rights. The submission addresses arguments that have been put forward against embracing human rights and provides concrete recommendations for strengthening the draft framework.Read more here.

The rights of Baka communities in the REDD+ Ngoyla-Mintom project in Cameroon

Of the indigenous hunter gatherer peoples of Cameroon (the peoples who self-identify as ‘autochthonous’), the Baka are the largest group, numbering about 40,000 and living in an area of 75,000 km2 in the south-west of the country; the Bagyeli/Bokola are the second-largest group with approximately 3,700 people living near the coast in an area of about 12,000 km2; and the third-largest group are the Bedzang who live in the forests north-west of Mbam (Ngambe-Tikar), in the Central Region.

NGOs call for FLEGT Action Plan to be strengthened

In this briefing, UK and European NGOs call on the EU to maintain, upgrade and strengthen its FLEGT programme. Key recommendations include the need to take specific measures to ensure that FLEGT in general, and VPAs and timber legality assurance systems specifically, include language on compliance with international human rights law as an essential element of “legality” in timber supply chains.

FPIC not FPICon: when support is not enough

FPP has released this briefing note reviewing the serious implementation challenges that the World Bank has faced in trying to meet its unique standard of ‘broad community support’ and argues for the adoption of the internationally recognised standard of free, prior and informed consent, now widely adopted by private and public sector financial institutions including by the International Finance Corporation (part of the World Bank Group).

Continuing issues with the World Bank ESF

FPP’s formal submission to the third phase of the consultations for the World Bank Safeguard Review highlight continuing concerns with adequately addressing implementation challenges, overall weakening of the ESF through transfer of responsibilities to borrowers, ambiguity about the impact on the Inspection Panel’s ability to fulfil its mandate and inadequate definition of free, prior and informed consent.

Pushing for peace in Colombia: Indigenous and Afro-Descendant Peoples join forces to uphold their rights, address mining-related conflict

This report synthesizes the outcomes of Year 1 (2014-2015) of a two year inter-ethnic project between the Embera Chamí People of the Resguardo Indígena Cañamomo Lomaprieta (Riosucio, Supía – Caldas) and Afro-Descendant Communities of the Palenke Alto Cauca – Proceso de Comunidades Negras (northern Cauca) aimed at organizational strengthening and territorial defense around extractives and ethnic rights, with technical support by the Forest Peoples Programme. The project is funded by the Embassy of Norway in Colombia, and the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

Respecting Rights? Assessing Oil Palm Companies’ Compliance with FPIC Obligations: A case study of EPO and KLK LIBINC Estate in Grand Bassa, Liberia

This review is the result of several years of fieldwork by the Sustainable Development Institute (SDI), and is the first step of a UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) funded project that examines putting into practice in Liberia the FAO Technical Guide entitled ‘Respecting free, prior and informed consent, Practical guidance for governments, companies, NGOs, indigenous peoples and local communities in relation to land acquisition’.

Respecting Rights? Assessing Oil Palm Companies’ Compliance with FPIC Obligations: A case study of Maryland Oil Palm Plantation in south-eastern Liberia

This review is the result of several years of fieldwork by the Liberian civil society organisation Social Entrepreneurs for Sustainable Development (SESDev), in partnership with the UK-based Forest Peoples Programme (FPP), and is part of a UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) funded project that examines putting into practice in Liberia the FAO Technical Guide entitled ‘Respecting free, prior and informed consent, Practical guidance for governments, companies, NGOs, indigenous peoples and local communities in relation to land acquisition’.