Resources

'Conflict or Consent?' Chapter 9: Sarawak: IOI-Pelita and the community of Long Teran Kanan

This is the ninth chapter of 'Conflict or Consent? The oil palm sector at a crossroads'.

This case study looks in some detail at oil palm concessions granted in 1996 to a local joint venture company Rinwood-Pelita on the middle Tinjar river in northern Sarawak which overlaps the customary lands of communities of the Berawan, Kayan and Kenyah peoples. The local enterprise was acquired by the Malaysian transnational palm oil company, IOI, a prominent member of the RSPO, in 2006.

'Conflict or Consent?' Chapter 10: Sabah: Genting Plantations and the Sungai and Dusun Peoples

This is the tenth chapter of 'Conflict or Consent? The oil palm sector at a crossroads'.

This study examines an oil palm plantation being developed in the very centre of Sabah by the Kuala Lumpur-based Malaysian company Genting, which has interests in real estate development, casinos, tourism as well as palm oil. Its subsidiary Tanjung Bahagia Sdn Bhd has opened up some 8,000 ha of lands with an associated palm oil mill on lands claimed by the Sungai and Dusun peoples of Tongod District in the headwaters of the Kinabatangan river. After unsuccessful attempts at dialogue with the company and appeals to the government, in 2002, the communities took their case to court. During the past 10 years, the case has proceeded laboriously through the hierarchy of high courts, appeals courts and the Federal Court but owing to sustained objections by the defendants the communities’ pleadings have yet to be heard. The case exemplifies the tensions between the RSPO’s voluntary standard, which requires respect for customary rights and the right to Free, Prior and Informed Consent, and the State’s laws and land allocation procedures, which deny these same rights.

'Conflict or Consent?' Chapter 11 The Mani people of Thailand on the agricultural frontier

This is the eleventh chapter of 'Conflict or Consent? The oil palm sector at a crossroads'.

This paper results from a short diagnostic survey, undertaken jointly by the Indigenous Peoples Foundation of Thailand and the Forest Peoples Programme in January 2013. The study aimed to ascertain the situation of the Mani people in relation to agricultural expansion, draw attention to their plight and consolidate links between them and the indigenous peoples of the north.

'Conflict or Consent?' Chapter 12: Sime Darby oil palm and rubber plantation in Grand Cape Mount County, Liberia

This is the twelth chapter of 'Conflict or Consent? The oil palm sector at a crossroads'.

Introduction:

Sime Darby’s oil palm and rubber concession in Grand Cape Mount county in northwest Liberia has come under sharp national and international focus after a complaint was submitted under the RSPO New Plantings Procedure (NPP) in November 2011. The complaint, submitted by communities affected by the concession, claimed that their Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) had not been sought, and that the destruction of their farmlands by the company in order to plant palm oil was leaving them destitute. Sime Darby’s concession also includes land in the neighbouring counties of Bomi, Gbarpolu and Bong.This case study, based on field research conducted in February 2012, assesses the nature and extent of community involvement in the acquisition of land for Sime Darby’s concession in Grand Cape Mount, in particular with regard to whether the right to Free, Prior and Informed Consent was respected.1 See page 315 for Sime Darby’s own map of the new plantings area and affected towns in Grand Cape Mount county.

Mining the Womb of the Earth: Struggles of Indigenous Women against destructive mining

This publication, published by AIPP, is a collection of stories of struggle of some indigenous women in Asia who directly face the negative impacts of mining. This publication is part of the Indigenous Peoples Human Rights Defenders Network (IPHRD Net) efforts to inform actors and stakeholders of the efforts of indigenous women and their communities to address violations of their rights, particularly their collective rights as indigenous peoples. The IPHRD Net is supported by the European Instrument for Democracy and Human Rights (EIDHR).

FPP E-Newsletter December 2013 (PDF Version)

Dear Friends,

What are the prospects for securing the land rights of indigenous peoples, local communities, and women in the foreseeable future?

Significantly, the report of the United Nations Secretary-General’s High Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda, under Goal 1 to “End Poverty”, sets a target to “Increase by x% the share of women and men, communities, and businesses with secure rights to land, property, and other assets”.

Mediation: Strategy or Objective? Reflections on the conflict mediation process between PT Asiatic Persada and the Suku Anak Dalam (Batin Sembilan) communities of Jambi, Indonesia

This report summarises the various phases of the mediation process between PT Asiatic Persada and the Batin Sembilan communities in Jambi, Sumatra, including the initial phase of mediation by SETARA and the second phase of mediation facilitated by the Joint Mediation Team of the International Finance Corporation Compliance Advisor/Ombudsman (IFC CAO) and the Jambi province government.

The Rights of Non-Indigenous ‘Forest Peoples’ with a focus on Land and Related Rights - Existing International Legal Mechanisms and Strategic Options

The rights of indigenous and tribal peoples are relatively well defined in international law and to some extent, however imperfectly, also in a growing number of national laws. This is largely due to decades of indigenous advocacy at the national and international levels, which has resulted in considerable (although still evolving) jurisprudence, international instruments on indigenous peoples’ rights, and an established institutional presence within intergovernmental organisations.

Letter to UNESCO reiterating concerns over the designation of the Lake Bogoria site as a World Heritage Site without obtaining the FPIC of the Endorois

The Endorois Welfare Council, IWGIA, Minority Rights Group and Forest Peoples Programme have written to UNESCO to express their continued concerns over the designation of the Lake Bogoria site (in Kenya) as a World Heritage Site without obtaining the free, prior and informed consent of the Endorois, who are the rightful owners of the land in and around the site. 

New publication by CED: A Simplified Guide to Forest Monitoring for Local Communities

The Centre for the Environment and for Development (CED) has published a new guide on forest monitoring for use by local communities. The aim of the guide is to inform and raise awareness of the benefits of forest monitoring by communities, and to present the main methods and necesssary tools to ensure good forest governance. It is intended to provide local forest communities with the necessary skills and tools to effectively identify and denounce activities of illegal forest exploitation taking place around them.

Palm Oil Innovation Group (POIG) Charter

The Palm Oil Innovation Group (POIG) is made up of producers and civil society organisations and includes Agropalma, DAABON, New Britain Palm Oil, as well as WWF, Rainforest Action Network (RAN), Forest Peoples Programme and Greenpeace.

New publication by AIPP - Learn and Exercise Your Rights: A simplified version of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP)

While indigenous peoples are five percent of the global population, they comprise fifteen percent of the poorest of the poor. Throughout centuries, indigenous peoples have been asserting and defending their lands, territories and resources as the source of their distinct identities, cultures and ways of life. They continue to voice and demand the recognition of their collective rights as a matter of attaining equality and dignity for all.

Conflict or Consent? The oil palm sector at a crossroads

Click here to read related PRESS RELEASE.

Read this report in English or in Bahasa Indonesia

Growing global demand for palm oil is fuelling the large-scale expansion of oil palm plantations across Southeast Asia and Africa. Concerns about the environmental and social impacts of the conversion of vast tracts of land to monocrop plantations led in 2004 to the establishment of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), which encourages oil palm expansion in ways that do not destroy high conservation values or cause social conflict. Numerous international agencies have also called for reforms of national frameworks to secure communities’ rights and to develop sound land governance.